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Comment reply on Forum Topic "Incompatibility Issue with Z370-e Motherboard and RAM"

  • 26 days ago
  • 2 points

What symptoms are you experiencing?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "which ssd to buy from these 2?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I recommend buying the one that costs the least. Here's why:

1) Performance (e.g. speed) is comparable between these two SSDs ... that is, they really "trade blows" in speed. You would have a very hard time noticing the difference between these two.

2) Endurance ... both have endurance so high that they will likely to become obsolete/replaced before you where them out. For example, you would have to write 380+GB per day every day for 5 years straight to hit the 700TBW warranty in 5 years for the Crucial MX500 2TB 2.5" SSD. For the 860 Evo it equates to having to write 650+GB per day every day for 5 years straight to hit the 700TBW warranty in 5 years. So unless you have a very heavy write workload that requires writing very large files over and over every day (like video production), then endurance for both these SSDs is more than plenty.

So typically the practical difference is whether the cost difference between the two is worth it, noting that these SSDs can go on sale. If both cost about the same, then get the 860 Evo (to get extra endurance for no extra cost). But if one costs more, I recommend you weigh whether that feature/specification difference justifies the additional cost. For example, in the US, the 2TB 860 Evo costs $350 and the 2TB MX500 costs $250. That extra $100 price premium is not worth it to get the Evo, in my opinion.

BTW, I think you can get better prices in the UK than the ones linked above: Crucial MX500 2TB 2.5" SSD and Samsung 860 Evo 2TB 2.5" SSD

Comment reply on Forum Topic "SSD and motherboard support"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

It'll work just fine, even though it's not listed in the mobo QVL. SATA is SATA.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "which ssd to buy from these 2? Crucial MX500 2TB SATA 2.5" 7mm (with 9.5mm adapter) Internal SSD or"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I recommend buying the one that costs the least. Here's why:

1) Performance (e.g. speed) is comparable between these two SSDs ... that is, they really "trade blows" in speed. You would have a very hard time noticing the difference between these two.

2) Endurance ... both have endurance so high that they will likely to become obsolete/replaced before you where them out. For example, you would have to write 380+GB per day every day for 5 years straight to hit the 700TBW warranty in 5 years for the Crucial MX500 2TB 2.5" SSD. For the 860 Evo it equates to having to write 650+GB per day every day for 5 years straight to hit the 700TBW warranty in 5 years. So unless you have a very heavy write workload that requires writing very large files over and over every day (like video production), then endurance for both these SSDs is more than plenty.

So typically the practical difference is whether the cost difference between the two is worth it, noting that these SSDs can go on sale. If both cost about the same, then get the 860 Evo (to get extra endurance for no extra cost). But if one costs more, I recommend you weigh whether that feature/specification difference justifies the additional cost. For example, in the US, the 2TB 860 Evo costs $350 and the 2TB MX500 costs $250. That extra $100 price premium is not worth it to get the Evo, in my opinion.

BTW, I think you can get better prices in the UK than the ones linked above: Crucial MX500 2TB 2.5" SSD and Samsung 860 Evo 2TB 2.5" SSD

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Top mounted psu vs bottom mounted psu"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

which case are you looking at?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "(Once again) Fan power supply question"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

ah ... i forgot to check

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I run this?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Yes, you can use it safely, especially since you've already ordered a new PSU that's better quality (EVGA G2 ... 850W is a bit overkill but that's fine).

Note that the Thermaltake Smart 600W is really a 500W PSU (e.g. 500W continuous power on 12V) ... but this is more than enough to handle RX580 and Ryzen 1700X build.

Just be careful when you swap PSUs since you'll be unplugging all the power cables and then plugging in all new power cables.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cables (no instructions)"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Piggybacking on Eltech's post ... and assuming when you listed "z390e" that you mean the Asus ROG Strix Z390E motherboard.

Please reference the Z390 mobo manual (available here: https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1151/ROG_STRIX_Z390-E_GAMING/E14841_ROG_STRIX_Z390-E_GAMING_UM_V2_WEB.pdf?_ga=2.51806953.1186972773.1553847941-1669585930.1553720422)

SYSTEM PANEL--See page 1-2: The mobo diagram shows where the system panel connectors are (item #11) ... which will be for the following case cables: Power LED (PLED), Power Switch (PWRBTN#), HDD LED (HDD_LED), and Reset Switch (RESET). See also page 1-20 which zooms in on the system panel connectors so you can match the connectors to the right pins .

HD AUDIO--See page 1-2: The mobo diagram shows where the HD audio connector is (item #18). See also page 1-18 for more details on connecting the HD audio.

USB 3.1 Gen 2--See page 1-2: The mobo diagram shows where the USB 3.1 Gen 2 front panel connector is (item #7). See also page 1-14 for more details on connecting the USB 3.1 Gen 2 front panel connector.

USB 3.1 Gen 1--See page 1-2: The mobo diagram shows where the USB 3.1 Gen 1 connector is (item #14). See also page 1-15 for more details on connecting the USB 3.1 Gen 2 connector.

USB 2.0--See page 1-2: The mobo diagram shows where the USB 2.0 connector is (item #13). See also page 1-16 for more details on connecting the USB 2.0 connector.

Also, what case do you have? Does it have RGB?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Transferring Hard drive to SSD"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

velcro works pretty good too

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2 x m.2-2280 vs 1 x m.2-2280 and 1 x 2.5""

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

You are right that both come in M.2 form factor ... the Intel 660P is an M.2 NVME SSD. That said, in your original post, you listed the "1 x Crucial - MX500 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive" which is the 2.5" version of the MX500 ... thus my question to clarify. Yes, the Crucial MX500 M.2 SATA SSD is M.2 2280.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Transferring Hard drive to SSD"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Most SSDs come with software that allows you to clone a HDD. For example, the Samsung Data Migration Tool (downloadable online) can clone HDDs onto Samsung SSDs ... and it's pretty darn good. Several other SSD manufactures use Acronis True Image.

What SSD do you have?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2 x m.2-2280 vs 1 x m.2-2280 and 1 x 2.5""

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

A question ... what work will you be using these SSDs for? gaming? streaming? video editing? video rendering?

Cost: Right now, 2x 660P's cost less than a 660p plus a crucial MX500 2.5". From a cost perspective, makes more sense to buy 2x 660P's.

Performance: 660P NVMe SSDs perform faster (1800Bps read/1800MBps write [to SLC cache]) than Crucial MX500 SATA SSD (560MBps read/510MBps write). It will depend upon your workload whether or not you would notice the performance difference day-to-day or in aggregate if you happen have a heavy storage workload over time.

Endurance: MX500 endurance (360TBW; 5 year warranty) is better than 660P endurance (200TBW; 5 year warranty). That said, 200TBW would equate to writing 100+GB per day every day for 5 years straight. So the endurance calculus depends upon how heavy of a write workload you will have. Of note: the QLC NAND that is used in the 660P is much newer technology that doesn't yet have a track record of performance/reliability to draw from (b/c it's still so new).

Note: the MX500 SATA SSD comes in M.2 SATA form factor as well and for the same price ... so if you're mobo support M.2 SATA, then you could get the same MX500 performance and save yourself some cables.

In general (without knowing more about your particular use-case for this machine), I would recommend the 2x 660P's.

One last question ... just curious as to why/reasoning for getting 2x 1TB SSDs as opposed to 1x bigger 2TB SSD?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NVME on PCIe x4 or x2"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

day-to-day, you most likely will not notice the difference unless you do heavy very workloads to/from storage.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "added a second video card to build. still got overall psu cover or no?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

650W will be enough for this build. That said, be sure to double-check if your PSU has enough PCI-e power cables for your 2x GPUs.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is a PSU Wattage over what your system uses ok to use?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Derpitron,

If your build will use around 109 watts, then any PSU above that is just fine. The PSU will only draw/use the power needed and won't ever provide "too much charge". So using a 350W or 400W PSU is just fine...it won't hurt anything at all, and you won't have any problems.

If you'd like more assurances, please share a little more info about the components of your build. I do partially agree with mark5916 that I don't typically recommend any PSUs below 450W ... but it does depend a lot on your specific build and what you're using it for. With only 109W, I'm assuming this is a machine basically for surfing the web and maybe some office automation applications.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The new WD Black SN750 vs Samsung 970 EVO Plus"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

The performance differences between these two SSDs is too close to call ... so you can't go wrong with either one. I recommend picking the one you can get for the best price.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Difference between lga 1151 mobo b360m and h310m ?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

https://www.pcworld.com/article/3268063/intel-motherboard-z370-vs-h370-vs-b360-vs-h310-8th-gen-cpu.html

I don't recommend any H310 mobos to anyone...they are just too stripped down and don't make a lot of sense to me for someone building their own rig. I recommend going with a B360 mobo.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with using a Samsung 970 SSD with my Motherboard"

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

OP, in addition, please reference page 1-21 of your mobo manual.

Note that since you happen to be using an NVMe M.2 drive with this mobo (in either M.2_1 or M.2_2) that no SATA ports will be disabled--so you are good to go.

If you would have been installing an M.2 SATA SSD, then the manual explains that "When the M.2_1 (Socket 3) is operating in SATA mode, SATA port 2 (SATA6G_2) will be disabled." This does not apply to you since you have an NVMe/PCIe SSD. But even if it did, you would have 5x more SATA ports available to use (#1, #3, #4, #5, and #6).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Searching for a motherboard with Realtek audio."

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

can you provide additional information about their "older system"? what vendor, any details on CPU & mobo? what realtek processor they have?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Wiping HDDs"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

In addition to the tools Warlock mentions (DBAN, Eraser), there are several other options for drive wipe utilities -- for example, CCleaner (under "Tools" tab) includes a "Drive Wiper" utility with multiple options in easy pulldown menus. It's available for download at https://www.ccleaner.com/ccleaner/download/standard.

First, install the drive you want to erase into the computer.

Then run CCleaner.

Select the "Tools" Tab and select the "Drive Wiper" subtab.

Check box the drive you want to erase (be sure to check the correct drive).

Select the type of "Wipe" you want to do from the pulldown (Entire Drive or Free Space Only) ... go with "Entire Drive".

Select the "Security" level you want to wipe to (Simple Overwrite (1 pass), Advanced Overwrite (3 passes), Complex Overwrite (7 passes), or Very Complex Overwrite (35 passes).

Double-check all the settings (in particular which drive you picked to wipe).

Then hit the "Wipe" button.

That's about all there is to it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus z390"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Which Asus Z390 mobo do you have? And what settings do you have questions about? Would also be helpful to know a little more about your system components (specific mobo, CPU, RAM, GPU, PSU, storage)?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How do I choose a motherboard?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

More expensive mobos typically come with additional ports (like USB-C, on-board wifi, more USB 3.1 ports, better on-board sound processing), "better" VRMs for power delivery and overclocking CPUs, and features for looks/asthetics like RGB. The more of these you have, then the more expensive the mobo is typically. Things you cannot see on more expensive mobos have to do with the PCB having more layers to better separate the traces, again to improve performance (more layers equals more expensive). Other features you might not be able to see is if the mobo supports SLI/Crossfire (not all mobos do ... it's a feature that costs a little extra). Some mobos take these extra features to the extreme--which the average consumer would never use while extreme overclockers would use them.

So the first questions I have for you is what do you plan to use your new computer for? Do you plan to overclock? What's your budget? What other components are you considering...which helps to pair components that "make sense" together (for example, pairing a $580 i9-9900K CPU on a cheap mobo doesn't make sense since the mobo will not allow you to overclock well, and vice-versa)? Answering these questions first will help narrow down the mobo choices to the ones that make more sense for you and your use case.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Help with OEM Motherboard and Case Front Panel Connector"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

what OEM motherboard do you have?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I think that will depend on the size of the files, the resolution you'll be editing at, and how much you'll be video editing.

I recommend going ahead and working off the SSD for several weeks so you can collect data on how much you'll be writing to the SSD on average. This will give you a better sense.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I think that will depend on the size of the files, the resolution you'll be editing at, and how much you'll be video editing.

I recommend going ahead and working off the SSD for several weeks so you can collect data on how much you'll be writing to the SSD on average. This will give you a better sense.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I'm only getting the option for ethernet?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

What wifi router do you have at home?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I'm only getting the option for ethernet?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

Doesn't look like you have wifi in your build.

The ASRock - Fatal1ty B450 GAMING K4 does not come with on-board wifi (according to specification page, it comes with ethernet but not wifi), and I don't see a wifi add-in card or USB on your build.

I recommend getting a USB wifi, and you'll be all set.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NOOB in need of help"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

(see page 1-2 of your mobo manual).

To install an M.2 SATA SSD, you will install it in the M.2_1 slot located just above the GPU PCI-e slot (labeled PCIEX16_1) and a little below the CPU socket.

Slot M.2_2 only supports NVMe SSDs, and not M.2 SATA.

Does this answer your question?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Another M.2 comparability question"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes. A 970 Evo could be used in either M.2 slot (M.2_2 or M.2_1). M.2_2 only supports NVMe, while M.2_1 can support NVMe or SATA.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Another M.2 comparability question"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, this SSD is compatible with this mobo, according to the mobo manual.

Specifically, this is an M.2 SATA SSD. And this mobo has two M.2. slots. M.2_1 slot supports both SATA and NVMe ... so plug this SSD into it. M.2_2 slot only supports NVMe, so it will not work in that slot.

Note, when you use M.2_1 in SATA mode, this will disable the SATA port SATA1--so if you are also plugging in a normal SATA drive (like an HDD or 2.5" SDD) then be sure to use SATA2 thru SATA6, and not SATA1. You've got plenty to choose from.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget 500 gig SSD"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

From WD: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/6j448d,LRkj4D/

From Crucial: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/ft8j4D,fgZFf7/

From Samsung: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/6yKcCJ,M9rmP6/

All these are good. If you plan to clone a HDD onto the SSD, then I'd recommend Samsung -- it's got the most reliable cloning software (nothing wrong with the others ... just Samsung Data Migration tool is able to clone HDDs from many proprietary prebuilt systems).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "X-X motherboard compatibility PLEASE HELP X-X"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

PCPP is correct, Z370 mobos are compatible with 8th gen Intel CPUs, and with a bios update can support 9th gen Intel CPUs -- but Z370 is not compatible with 7th gen Intel CPUs (like the 7600K).

So your choices are to keep the 7600K and pair it with a Z270 mobo (or a compatible Z170 mobo with a bios update).

What's your complete parts list? Is this a new build or are you upgrading an existing build?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC Crashing Again"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm thinking your PSU may be having issues (especially since you have to physically unplug it to restart).

As legomaster has already asked, what's your parts list, and how long have you had this computer?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "best storage option for 120 bucks"

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

For a $120 budget, you've got enough to get an inexpensive SSD for your boot/OS drive and a solid HDD for data/games/mass storage. Something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
Storage Team - L5 LITE 3D 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $29.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $84.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-09 18:00 EST-0500

You can opt for more (you've still got $40 to spend), but that would depend on the rest of your budget rig. That $40 could potentially be "better spent" towards another component (GPU, CPU, RAM).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ROG strix z390 help."

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Glad you're up and running, thanks to mark5916!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 60 c idle good?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

did you build your PC or buy it? what are your system specs?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 60 c idle good?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

You should also consider blowing out your CPU heatsink with canned air (if you haven't done it in a while) ... couldn't hurt but could help.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is 60 c idle good?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The A10 9700 max temp is 90 degrees ... above that it will turn itself off.

You can get a better CPU cooler (I'm assuming you're running a stock cooler).

You can also try to disable the onboard R7 GPU graphics on your CPU, through BIOS or device manager. It may help.

BTW, I'm assuming your monitor is plugged directly into the RX 570, right ... and nothing is plugged into the mobo display connector?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ROG strix z390 help."

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

There's a battery (called a "BIOS battery" or "CMOS batter") on all motherboards ... it's round/circular and you can't miss it. For the Asus Z390-E, it is located just below the PCIE_1 slot. It's basically a watch battery (and is removed the same way you would remove a watch batter) and this battery allows the motherboard to "remember" BIOS settings. Turning the PSU off (at the back) and removing this battery will clear the BIOS memory of all settings ... setting the BIOS settings back to default. This will basically hard force to Clear the CMOS.

To answer your second question, yes, the RAM you have selected is compatible with this mobo. More specifically, I checked the QVL for this mobo (https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/ROG-STRIX-Z390-E-GAMING/HelpDesk_QVL/) and it is listed. Which means Asus tested this RAM with this mobo and the tests passed.

The above steps will help clear the CMOS, ensure the two sticks are in the right slots, and then fire up your computer. If it does not work, then next step is to remove one stick and try again. And if that doesn't work, then switch sticks (again just with one) and try again. This testing will determine if there is something wrong with your RAM sticks -- which would require you to RMA them.

Hope this helps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Lag"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

What are the rest of your system specs? Also, what resolution do you play at?

Also, can you describe the "lag spikes"? What do you mean?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I’m right there with you (I’m OCD when it comes to my computer and things like this).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, your SSD will be just fine ... no problem at all ... and it will not “hurt”the SSD in any way. And you can put more files and games on it, no problem. Also, please take a look at my other post about 24 minutes ago.

My SSD is my boot drive/OS, office apps, and many of the games I play most often (Prey, Far Cry 5, Wolfenstien 2, Quake Champions, Bioshock Infinite) and I “moved” several of my older games to the HDD b/c I still play them every once in a while. The SSD is working just fine ... no issues will endurance ... after a year of use it’s only up to 4.3 TBW out of the warrantied 360TBW (a little over 1%). At this pace, I expect this SSD will last long past the 5 year warranty. This will be the same case with your SSD. And like I said, you can put more games on it no problem.

If you’re worried about performance when the SSD gets more full, then Samsung Magician allows you to setup Over Provisioning very easily, which will resolve this issue and contributes to even longer endurance for the SSD.

SSDs have come a long way ... you can feel safe putting Rust and multiple other games on your SSD and enjoying the decreased load times.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

That's a great SSD. I've got the same one in my laptop. It's got a 5 year warranty and is also warrantied to 300 TBW (Terabytes Written) ... which is a whole lot. To give you a sense, I have another Samsung SSD in my gaming rig that I've had for over a year now that runs my OS, office applications, and several of my games and after a year, I've only "used" 4.3 TBW so far (I have some games on my SSD and some on my HDD which also serves to store my data files). Or put another way, you would have to write 164GB/day for 5 years straight to get up to 300 TBW--that would be like installing Far Cry 5 two times a day and Far Cry 4 ... every day for a year--and that's just to hit the warrantied endurance.

Really, the main folks that worry about SSD endurance are video editors and photo editors who move and process very very large files. For average users, the written endurance is ridiculously more than enough.

Oh, I'd also recommend installing Samsung Magician (if you haven't already). It's a good utility to monitor the health and usage of your Samsung SSD. You don't need to, but if you're curious how many TBW you have written, it will tell you.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

That is wrong.

BTW, what SSD do you have?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PSU For overclocked build"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

CXM550 will be enough ... have fun overclocking!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

correct ... no issues

By the way, there's also a way in Steam to move a game (that's already downloaded) to another location.

Right click the game and select "Properties"

Select the tab "Local Files"

Click the button "Move Install Folder"

And enter the folder name you want to move the files to. For example, if your HDD is on the C: drive and your SDD is the D: drive, then you would enter "D:\Program Files (x86)\Steam"

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Steam Files"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

yes, it's okay to leave steam and some games on the hdd and re-download/download other games on the ssd

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New new Power supply"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

in reference to the question, specific components can help us better understand your rig to make better suggestions.

On brands, the reason that it is not suggested to go just with a "brand" is that all brands make better versus poorer quality PSUs. For example, EVGA makes some high quality PSUs (like EVGA 650 G3) that would be recommended and some not-so-great PSUs (like the EVGA 650W). Same for other brands.

So some questions that will help us provide better suggestions:

1) What's your budget? (e.g. is money no object, do you have a set limit, or something in between ... there are quality suggestions at different price points).

2) Are you looking for a standard sized PSU (e.g. ATX) or something smaller (SFX)? Understanding your case and build (EATX, ATX, vs mini-ITX).

3) What do you use this computer for (gaming, professional rig, office work, video production)?

4) Would be helpful to understand your components. Sometimes we can get a better sense based on the build ... if your spending more money on components for a $3000 high end rig, then it makes more sense to spend more on a higher quality PSU. If you have a more budget rig, then a more budget PSU would make more sense.

5) Do you plan to overclock or extreme overclock?

6) Do you have a preference for modular, semi-modular, or non-modular PSU?

7) Do you have any preferences for quiet?

Making some broad assumptions about what you might be looking for, I can offer some generic suggestions: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/y88H99,DQx9TW,qZKhP6,WrNypg/

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