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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "550W 80+ White ofr 1650 Super"

  • 14 days ago
  • 1 point

Hi,
Power supply efficiency has no effect on anything connected to it, and isn't related to quality or what components you can connect to it at all.

Cooler Master MWE 550W 230V 80+ Standard is low quality and group regulated, which means it wasn't made to work with modern components. It may work ok with a weak graphics card like 1650 Super, but it's more suitable for replacing an old PSU in an old pre-built Dell computer with a Pentium with integrated graphics, and not a gaming PC at all.

Simce it's also 230V only, you may also have sudden shutdowns in case of a brownout in your electrical circuit, or it may even die or blow up because the primary side components are rated at only half the current of a proper full range PSU.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rosewill Tachyon 1200W"

  • 25 days ago
  • 1 point

Yea exactly, there's no reviews of any flavour of this internal design - Rosewill's, Green's, or High Power's themselves. It looks great internally and in principles, but there's no telling how it actually behaves unfortunately.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rosewill Tachyon 1200W"

  • 25 days ago
  • 1 point

Like I said in the last part of my post, I generally look at factory documents from various OEMs, as well as into safety certification agencies such as TÜV, CCC, CE, UL, KCC, and more. And like I mentioned, even without access to those you can see the similarities - in fact the eBay link you found is great for that! The 2nd photo on the Ebay link gives you a very clear view of the input filter and part of the primary side of the PSU. On that photo, you can very clearly see the elements I mentioned in my post (the shielded APFC coil, bridge rectifiers, etc) and see that they match the parts found in the Green brand PSU.
While we're at the topic of visual differences, you can also notice how the modular sockets of Rosewill, Green, and High Power Astro PT APT-1200F are identical - it's very often a very easy and helpful indicator of many units using the same platform!
On a side note, in case you wonder - the Sirfa HPV platform comes in 1050W, 1200W, and 1350 wattages. Rosewill only ordered the 1200W version for their Tachyon 1200, while Green ordered all three flavours for their GP-something 1050, 1200 and 1350W.

Apologies for not including this 1200W Tachyon on my website - I'm aware, but I haven't gotten around to do that yet, which I deeply regret for this unit - and also several others from other brands, which should definitely be up there. The Sirfa platform listing for example is only up to Astro Gold HPJ and Astro PT G14C.

The unit released on Newegg at March 2019, so I wouldn't call it "super new". I think 3/4ths of a year is definitely enough time for something to appear on eBay! It's definitely not popular though, so it hardly has any interest on the internet, and Rosewill themselves stopped sending their PSUs to reviewers a long time ago as well.

And also... the Tachyon in your eBay link is literally sold by Newegg. :P This isn't sold by some normal person, or even a different store - it's exactly Newegg's eBay entry for this PSU.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rosewill Tachyon 1200W"

  • 25 days ago
  • 2 points

What saving for an extra switch? lol

"Save for" means "except".
Me saying "Save for the extra fanless switch, yes" means "they look the same, except for the extra fanless switch" :)

I'm not sure at the first time you understood what the second switch is for, since you keep calling it "second rear switch" and "two rear switches". I'll explain. The two rear switches on Green's version of this PSU do not serve the same purpose. The smaller switch is just a fanless switch, i.e. a switch allowing you to toggle semi-passive fan operation on or off. It has nothing to do with the internal platform of a PSU, and brands can choose to include it or not.

First example I can remember off the top of my head is the case of Corsair HX Platinum and RMx series - these two use the same platform inside, which I hope is known to you. The HX Platinum series includes a little switch to toggle the fanless mode, while the RMx series does not - CWT made it optional for vendors to include the switch or not.

The exact situation happens with our case here, with Sirfa's platform used in this Rosewill Tachyon and in the Green 1200 thingy. The platform itself, codenamed "HPV" internally, gives vendors an option to incorporate a fanless mode toggle into the case. The fan controller takes input from the little switch on the rear. If the vendor opts for no switch, the fanless operation is either always automatic, or off altogether.

Sirfa's (the factory who manufactures this platform) parent company, High Power, also sells this design under their own name: as the Astro PT APT-1200F model. When they sell it under their own name, they don't have the little fanless switch either - they chose not to include it to reduce the price, just like Rosewill.
Green however, chose to go with the switch for their GP1200B-OCDG. Either way, I must stress this again - this has nothing to do with the platform, i.e. the internal design of the power supply. All those power supplies are internally the same.

With that much said, I hope I sufficiently explained the purpose and origins of that little switch which piqued your curiosity :)

Oh, and the picture link I included is to visualize and go over the technology used in the PSUs - the topologies, components and other things I'm talking about in that section. It is not what I used to determine they use the same design - the picture is the effect of my efforts to determine that. I saw the Rosewill - checked which platform it uses inside - got the platform - checked what other PSUs use this platform - got the Green - and got an internal picture of the Green.
Besides that, I don't often have to use the "don't you know who I am" argument, but I guess it may be necessary here. I get it, sometimes I don't look at forum nicknames either. I am the founder of https://www.orionpsudb.com/. The database of power supply platforms. Every time you hear someone speak about "This PSU uses that platform" or "those two PSUs are actually the same PSU inside", chances are the source is my site. I DO have many insider resources which allow me to see what exactly leaves each PSU factory product lines and which label it gets on the side - Rosewill's, Green's, Corsair's, NZXT's or whoever's. I help several renowned (some of those considered the best) reviewers write their PSU articles in the regard of researching the factory origins of a given PSU or the name of the platform it uses. Me saying Rosewill and Green are the same internally isn't my opinion, or something I just "guessed" based on their looks, or a wet dream I had. I simply checked it and I know for a fact.

Oh, and even though the Rosewill photos are pretty dark, you can still see some of the platform's features through the rear vent. See the huge shielded APFC coil? See the two bridge rectifiers sandwiching the primary heatsink? See the very characteristic, yellow, cylindrical X capacitor (Sirfa's hallmark!)? Or the common mode choke and two Y caps? Cross-reference them with the photo of Sirfa HPV platform in the Green brand PSU and share your conclusions :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rosewill Tachyon 1200W"

  • 25 days ago
  • 1 point

Save for the extra fanless switch, yes. Is this a trick question, or something? :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rosewill Tachyon 1200W"

  • 27 days ago
  • 3 points

Rosewill Tachyon 1200W uses a very fresh platform by Sirfa, also used in Green GP1050B-OCDG, GP1200B-OCDG and GP1350B-OCDG. It looks like this: https://green.ir/assets/filemanager/userfiles/green/PSU/OCDG/GP1200B-OCDG/OCDG_Digitally_PSU_07.jpg

As you can see it's uses a half-bridge or full-bridge primary side topology with an LLC resonant converter, synchronous rectification and DC-DC converters on the secondary side, places +12V MOSFETs on the underside of the main PCB, uses wireless power transfer from the mainboard to the modular board and busbars, and vsense wires on the 24pin connector for better load regulation.

So in terms of design, it uses similarly high end technology as other high end PSUs like Corsair HX Platinum and the like.

There's no tests of this platform yet though, so you don't know how loud it is, what are the protection trip points and whether it has any problems.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rosewill Tachyon 1200W"

  • 27 days ago
  • 1 point

No that's an old PSU. Good but old

What he said is correct, Rosewill Tachyon 1200 was released early 2019. What makes you think that's an old PSU?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Does anyone own an EVGA W1 500?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

That review wasn't written by JonnyGURU. JonnyGURU hates this power supply.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Using two 6+2 pin for GPU?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

A splitter isn't a good idea, because the point where the PSU cable ends and the splitter begins is very vulnerable to overheating or shorting, since the contact point doesn't always connect perfectly - a continuous cable is always better. Every connection along the way is an additional point of failure.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Using two 6+2 pin for GPU?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Hello there domecrachi. Yeah, you can do that! In fact, this is exactly what the 6+2pin connector was designed for.

Allow me to ask one thing, and please don't feel offended. What did you think the 6+2pin connector was for, if not for using just the 6 part when needed? Why did they split it to six and two?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Evga GD (2019) 500W ~$45, is it ok?"

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Nobody tested it, so we have no idea if it's good or a bomb.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Underutilizing PSU will case power delivery issues?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Total horseshit :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Did my power supply arrive dead?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The adapter you bought specifically mentions your HP's name in the title, so I think the adapter is alright. Did you flip the on/off switch on the new PSU?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Did my power supply arrive dead?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The colors are a sign of problems with the graphics card itself or graphics card drivers, not insufficient power. If a computer overloads the power supply, the unit simply shuts down. Your original power supply was enough. (Don't look at power calculators here or elsewhere, they're terribly wrong. GTX 670 only uses around 160W at load.)

Also the other commenter doesn't seem to know that, but running a system on two PSUs requires more setup than just "plugging in the old psu to the mobo and the new one to everything else". Your suspicion of "does the power supply need a signal from the motherboard to tell it to supply power?" is correct. The motherboard sends a turn-on signal only to whichever PSU is connected to its main 16pin or 24pin connector. The secondary PSU won't turn on unless you bridge two specific pins on its 24pin connector with the main PSUs 16/24pin connector, so the turn-on signal from the motherboard reaches both PSUs.

Even then, running a system on two PSUs like yours is a bad idea, since they're both group regulated. Dividing the load between those two will create an uneven load on the different voltage rails, which can cause voltage to go out of spec and damage parts. If anybody wants to run a system from two PSUs, units using DC-DC converters are required.

But anyway, you can forget trying to power your system using two PSUs, or trying to adapt your new, standard-ATX PSU to work with your proprietary HP motherboard, because your problems most likely aren't caused by the PSU. When the graphics card starts displaying weird colors or artifacts, it's not a problem with the PSU - it's a problem with the graphics card.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Buying a Used PSU"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Is it the original HX750 Gold, or HX V2 Gold?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Choosing a PSU 319W"

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

Ayy lmao 👽

Comment reply on Forum Topic "EVGA Supernova G5 Reviews?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

To the point, does the G5 have Active Clamp and LLC resonant DC-to-DC converters? Or does this mean the G3 does not have Active Clamp?

G5 uses an Active Clamp Reset Forward topology on the primary side, and DC-DC converters on the secondary side.
G3 uses Half-Bridge topology with an LLC resonant converter on the primary side, and DC-DC converters on the secondary side.

Those are all names for different ways to design different places in the PSU. I'll skip all the technical explanations to get to your point: those terms don't directly mean anything to your gaming rig. They don't care what your PSU is made of. Ultimately, all your rig has to get is correct voltages at all times. It cares about the end result, not particularly how those results were achieved. So to determine whether the PSU is good, we just have to wait for tests and reviews.

Just like in graphics cards and CPUs, architecture articles can tout terms like "it's built on the Pascal architecture! It has Inifnity Fabric! It has Tensor cores!", but what matters in the end is results in benchmarks, games, and applications and whatever is important to you.

I could tell you that the Active Clamp Reset Forward primary topology like in the G5 is generally cheaper than Half-Bridge with LLC like in the G3, and that usually ACRF designs have worse transient response, but that's only generalizing and speculating. Once the G5 in particular is tested and reviewed, we'll be able to see how good it is. It might as well perform better than the G3 despite using cheaper design, who knows.

Some people on other forums (or anywhere in general) love to get overly attached to technical jargon they heard from professionals, and instantly jump into conclusions from them alone, most often without even understanding what they mean, or being unable to point them out in the internals. A few years ago, they'd go like "G5 is made by FSP, so it must be worse than G3 which was Super Flower!". Now they'd go like "G5 uses ACRF, so it must be worse than G3 which uses HB+LLC!". Jumping to conclusions is as harmful to yourself as blindly choosing, so let's always just wait for reviews.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "EVGA Supernova G5 Reviews?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Didn't you read all the other comments in this thread before writing your own, a full week after the initial discussion?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "EVGA Supernova G5 Reviews?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

And Thermaltake!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "EVGA Supernova G5 Reviews?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Tom's Hardware is wrong - they were either given wrong information by the booth staff, or only the showcase Computex units were made by SuperFlower. EVGA had to switch G5 to FSP.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "EVGA Supernova G5 Reviews?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 3 points

No reviews, for now it's only confirmed it uses Active Clamp Reset Forward topology, which means it's an FSP design. However the quality and performance is unknown, because no reviews.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best PSU under $110"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

It sure would - current EVGA G5 by FSP is a completely different power supply than whatever they had at Computex.

There won't be a G7 either, by the way. Super Flower pretty much cut ties with EVGA.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best PSU under $110"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

I've seen this article when it was published, and the article is wrong. Either Aris was given wrong information by the booth staff, or the G5 was initially made by SF then changed production to FSP since then.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best PSU under $110"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Nope - G5 is FSP.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best PSU under $110"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

These PSUs are based on the Super Flower platform.

They are FSP.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Corsair RM550X not working after power shortage"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Corsair RM550x has a fuse, like any other power supply.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ATX12V"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

The 6pin aux power connector provided extra 5V and 3.3V power in the 1995 ATX specification.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Replacing The PSU But Not The Cables?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 2 points

EVGA BQ 650 and 500 are made by different companies, so it's likely their modular cables aren't compatible with each other. To make sure they are or are not, contact EVGA support.

Out of curiosity, what graphics card are you getting that needs a higher power PSU? Since you need 650W now, are you trying to SLI two RTX 2080 Ti on an overclocked i7 or i9?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First build help"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

You're asking us a question about your motherboard without telling what motherboard you have - we need to know that to say if it's normal or not.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "350w good for this ?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

The PSU is incredibly low quality and it's dangerous to use the PC with it installed, due to risk of damaging other components or even fire.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Where to get PCI-E cables for PSU-GPU?"

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

The first link is an extension cable.

The 2nd link is also an extension cable. It says so in the title.

It's unknown if the 3rd cable fits and support your particular Thermaltake PSU or not.

Since the PSU-side connectors are proprietary for each manufacturer (and even series within one manufacturer), the only way to obtain a cable is contacting Thermaltake directly.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Question : Can US power supplies plug into 220Volt"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Any PSU that can work on 110v will also work on 220v.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need PSU Opinions"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

The 18+10pin PSU connector is just for the motherboard 24pin cable. It has 28pins for the PSU socket, and 24pins for the motherboard socket. Some of the pins contain two wires for better voltage regulation, that's why the numbers aren't equal.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Bronze PSU. How long does it last?"

  • 8 months ago
  • 6 points

Efficiency and longevity have no correlation.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dual System"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Sure, you can.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PSU made clicking sounds when performing paper clip test."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

And only some PSUs have semi-passive fan operation, others don't. In CX it runs all the time.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PSU made clicking sounds when performing paper clip test."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

My psu seems to have the feature of turning the fan off when not under a large load.

It doesn't, it should always run.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this possible than turning on oven make a 1 second power outage in home? ( playing diablo 1 )"

  • 8 months ago
  • 3 points

Power outages don't trip fuses or breakers. Short-circuits or power surges trip fuses or breakers.

Software bugs, like a game crashing to desktop, are impossible to cause by the power supply.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Wondering if PSU can handle my PC upgrade."

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

Impossible to say, you didn't tell us what power supply you have exactly.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What's the Practical Difference Between Single and Multi-Rail modes?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

Yes, it is. Corsair HX850 has multiple rails configured in such way that each PSU-side connector gets its own rail. Each rail has OCP set at 40A, so in case of a short circuit it will **** off when it reaches 480W power draw from that connector, but also the limit is high enough that the GPU doesn't reach it under normal operation. 2080 Ti will never draw 480W unless it short circuits.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What's the Practical Difference Between Single and Multi-Rail modes?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Multiple rails don't have any effect on output voltages or voltage regulation. There's only one +12V tap coming off the main transformer and only one +12V pi filter; multiple-rail is simply extra voltage shunts monitoring current on groups of wires.

What you say would have been true if multiple-rail power supplies had multiple 12V generation circuits inside (like the very old 2009 Corsair HX1000), but that's not the case. They only have one 12V output with extra current monitoring components.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need a 750W or more power supply, semi or fully modular."

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

A hard drive consumes about 5W.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What's the Practical Difference Between Single and Multi-Rail modes?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 4 points

Multiple rails is like the breaker box in your house. In case of a short circuit, a breaker will cut the power before something burns.

If you have a single rail power supply, then if your graphics card slow short-circuits, it starts demanding infinite power from the PSU. In single-rail PSU there's nothing to stop it, so it will pull increasingly more power, up to your PSU's total capacity. The cable and connector will melt and burn far before it reaches the over-power protection of the PSU.

If you have a multi rail PSU and your graphics card short circuits, then it will also demand increasingly more power. But then it will hit one of the OCP trip points assigned to the cable feeding it, which will trip the protection and **** everything down, far before it reaches so high power draw that anything melts or burns.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is 450W enough for this build?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

What made you think that and how much power do you think the PC will consume under different circumstances?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Custom Cables"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

I think the most popular store with custom sleeved cables is CableMod.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "It seems that Seasonic's "new" S12III is actually WORSE than the S12II..."

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

There's no great view but I don't see a Switcher before the transformer that regulates the 12v output, further confirming the group regulated design.

Switcher before the transformer that regulates 12v... Have you got any example (from any PSU) of what exactly you're talking about?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "(Once again) Fan power supply question"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Simplest solution is connecting one of the five Molex connectors his PSU already has.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Seasonic or evga or be quiet"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

I can't really tell what you're asking of us.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Psu help"

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

No, it's not. In this case, we can tell you it's not ok even without knowing what it's going to power.

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