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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2560 x 1080 or 2560 x 1440 questions"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

You'd need to dial it down. My 780 runs BF3 at between 70 fps and 100 fps in BF3 depending on the map I'm on. In BF4 beta I was getting between 50 and 65, but I'm guessing that has more to do with drivers.

2560x1080 has 33% more pixels than 1920x1080. 33% less than 2560x1440. So since there aren't a lot of benchmarks out there for 2560x1080 (actually, I've seen none...) you could guestimate performance with percentages.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions wanted, $3500 limit."

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Sadly no black version of the Storm Stryker. But you can buy the Storm Trooper, which has the same internal layout and overall shape. Then you can buy a black windowed side panel from the Cooler Master online store... Kind of expensive, but hey that's how it is :/

The only differences between the Trooper and the Stryker are:

The Trooper has a front eSATA port but no side window.

The Stryker has a side window but no front eSATA port.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What Harddrives are better for what?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Much, much much much faster. Just in a completely different league. You would need a RAID 0 configuration of 10K rpm hard drives to match a single SSD's loading time.

If you're not sold on SSD prices but don't want a straight up HDD, you could try SSHDs. Solid State Hybrid Drives. They've got small SSDs built into them that handle burst loads very well, and they're available in large capacities like 2TB unlike SSDs, and for much cheaper.

Examples of burst loads would be opening up your browser, a game, voice chat, system tweaker, etc. That's what the small SSD is for.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "SLI/crossfire GPU"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Lower End: 650 Ti BOOST SLI

Low-Mid Range: 7870 XFire

Mid-Range: 7950 XFire or 660 Ti SLI

Mid-High Range: 280X XFire or 770 SLI

High End: 290X XFire or 780 SLI

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I use the included Thermal Paste with a 212 EVO or buy another brand?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

Use the included paste. You'd need a really substantial CPU cooler to make buying thermal paste worth the extra cost. The H212 EVO is a really good cooler for the value, but for the price of high quality thermal paste I think you'd be better off just using the money to buy a better cooler.

There might be something to getting MX-4 with an NH-D14 or an H80i though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2560 x 1080 or 2560 x 1440 questions"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

2560x1080 is a pretty interesting resolution. If you're looking at videos of games at that resolution though, beware. Since the YouTube player is a fixed aspect ratio of 16:9, you get those black bars on the bottom and top of the video. Those bars won't be there on a 2560x1080 monitor. It's important to note because those black bars on YouTube videos can give the illusion of higher contrast, making the actual gameplay footage look really really good.

If that kind of look is what you want, you'd actually be better off just getting a 2560x1440 monitor and then setting the resolution to 2560x1080 in Nvidia control panel or AMD Catalyst. That way you get the black bars and the illusion of higher contrast.

An actual 2560x1080 panel is cool though if you understand the black bar thing. They're designed for those who don't want multi-monitor setups. So if multi-monitor seems like a cool thing to you but you don't like bezels, 2560x1080 could be the way to go for you.

I remember there was a guy on the forums here a while back who wanted four 2560x1080 monitors so he could remove the bezels and stack them 2x2 for a "normal" looking aspect ratio.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS Rampage IV Black x79"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

I looked up the EVGA X79 Black and I can't see any heat pipes running to the I/O cover.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions wanted, $3500 limit."

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

I would drop the power supply to a an 750/760W or 850/860W. Your board won't support 3-way SLI so there's no point getting a kilowatt PSU, since that's what they're designed for.

It's more serious than that though. Higher end Corsair power supplies are most efficient at 70-80% load, so not only do you save money on a lower wattage PSU, you're also saving money on your electricity bill with a lower wattage PSU. And with power-hungry multi-card setups that can add up quickly.

The max a modern day dual-card, dual-GPU setup is going to draw is around 550-600W with both cards, the CPU, and RAM all overvolted, a full set of fans, multiple hard drives, and a water cooling pump. If you take the worst case scenario, which is 600W of power draw and 70% load efficiency, 600/0.7 = 857, or about 860W. Best case scenario (550W draw @ 80% load efficiency) gives you about 700W and middle of the road (575W draw @ 75% load efficiency) is 760W.

But then you also have to take into account the baseline PSU efficiency. There's load efficiency and then wall efficiency. To power 1000W of components, your PSU would need a wattage rating of 1250 to take advantage of 80% load efficiency. But there's also the 80+ rating. A platinum PSU is 91% efficient, meaning that to power 1000W of stuff, you're actually literally drawing 1100W from the wall. That's your actual energy bill. The lower efficiency you go, the higher the wattage you pull from the wall. If you go all the way down to 80+, you draw 1250W from the wall - a full 150W more than on platinum.

TL;DR - For really power hungry setups, get as close to system wattage/0.75 as you can for your PSU wattage, and then as high 80+ efficiency as you can in your budget.

Everything else though looks pretty beast. Especially that Storm Stryker and PB278Q! I used both of those in my first build and love both of them to death. There's so much modding potential with the Stryker. In the future I want to mod two 240mm rads on the side HDD intakes. I can't think of another case that has that potential. And the monitor is simply stunning.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Would dual 7850s bottleneck an FX-6300?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes it would be. It would be perfect actually. Takes advantage of load efficiency pretty spot on once you overclock.

Comment reply on exii's Completed Build: Cherry X Exii

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

How did you mount that slim fan to the rad? Did you just cut some screws or did you actually buy some screws? (link please if you did!)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mini Tower Build?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks good. Only 1 thing I would change though, and that's the PSU.

Get something from Seasonic, Corsair, NZXT, Antec, PC Power & Cooling, Cooler Master, Fractal Design, EVGA, Be Quiet!, OCZ, or Enermax.

80+ Bronze rated, semi or fully modular, and in Tier 3 or higher of this list: http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mini Tower Build?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

1920x1080 is much better, and you can get monitors with that resolution for the same price as the 1600x900 one you've chosen. It's more demanding to display because there are more pixels, but you get a much nicer picture.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this a good build"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

For a video editing machine that can run a triple monitor setup, I recommend this:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1SkiI

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mini Tower Build?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Fluid 60 with an R9 280X at 900p? The only game I can think of is Skyrim with an absolute obscene amount of mods lol. Even Crysis 3 would run a fluid 60.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this a good build"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

What video editing applications do you use/want to use?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this a good build"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

That value is irrelevant because:

"Maximum: Furmark Stability Test at 1280x1024, 0xAA. This results in a very high non-game power consumption that can typically be reached only with stress-testing applications. The Card was left running the stress test until power draw converged to a stable value. On cards with power-limiting systems, we disabled the power-limiting system or configured it, if possible, to the highest available setting. We also used the highest single reading from a Furmark run which was obtained by measurements taken faster than the power limit could kick in."

There's no point buying a more expensive higher wattage PSU just so you can unlock power restrictions and run Furmark. Nobody does that. I think it makes more sense to look at "Peak". Who wants to spend money to run an artificial stresser? That's silly. I recommend based on non-silly statistics, like their "Peak" test results.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this a good build"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Since you haven't provided any info about the computer you want, I just modified some basic things in the list:

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1SjEX

Lowered the PSU, swapped the optical drive to a lower-cost and practically identical performance one (trusty 24B1ST), and added an SSD.

Price is 10 bucks more but you get better power efficiency and an SSD.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this a good build"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

What's your budget, what do you want to do with your PC, and are there any specific applications you want to use? That's what determines if it's a good build.

The PSU is really overkill though. A 7990 system fully overclocked doesn't draw more than 500W. You'd be fine with a 750 or 850W PSU. You would only need a kilowatt PSU if you wanted TWO 7990's, which is a terrible idea anyways.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mini Tower Build?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

He's chosen a 1600x900 monitor, of course it will :P In any game.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mini Tower Build?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

At 1600x900, 100% yes. There won't be any game where you won't get at least a fluid 60 fps with this setup.

At 1920x1080 most games will run a fluid 60 as well, with exceptions being (off the top of my head) Crysis 2 or 3, Metro: Last Light, and Far Cry 3.

I would seriously consider a 1920x1080 monitor though. You can find good ones for almost no extra cost compared to that 1600x900 monitor. I would go so far as to say an R9 280X is wasted on anything under 1920x1080.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help selecting a monitor?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 5 points

Should I get one with speakers or not?

Speakers don't have any effect on the quality of the panel. But if you're talking about the audio quality of built-in speakers, they normally really suck! :D You don't have to use them however, so if you've already got a sound system or are planning to get one, you can just leave the monitor speakers unused no problem. It would be silly I think to pass up a good monitor just because it has speakers in it.

Which is better to use HDMI or DVI and whats the difference?

For short runs between a tower and a 1080p/1200p screen, there is no difference in image quality between the two. They both carry the same signal and output just as well onto the screen. The only difference is that HDMI also carries an audio signal. So if you were going to use built-in speakers on a monitor, you would be able to run both video and audio off of a single HDMI cable. If you used DVI you would also need a separate audio cable to feed signal to the monitor speakers.

What all do I need to look for when buying one?

Response time of 6ms or lower, resolution of 1080p or 1200p (for a 24 inch screen). After that it gets pretty personal. You'll see refresh rates of 120Hz and 144Hz, and you'll also see IPS vs TN.

It's impossible to get a 1080/1200p IPS monitor with higher refresh rate than 60Hz, and it's impossible to get a 1080/1200p 120 or 144Hz monitor that is IPS. You have to choose either one.

Personally, I think IPS is vastly superior to high refresh rate. IPS offers you greater color quality. High refresh rate offers you low or nonexistent motion blur BUT you have to have the GPU horsepower to be getting at least around 90 fps in your games to benefit from it. In my opinion, people spend 1000's on machines so that they can get a pretty image on their monitor. I don't think a high refresh rate monitor is worth the sacrifice unless you make a living out of playing games competitively.

There's also glossy vs. matte vs. semi-glossy displays. Glossy is basically just a sheet of reflective glass over the panel. Matte is the same glass but treated with an anti-reflective coating to prevent reflections. Semi-glossy is a panel coated with semi-reflective coating.

Glossy will give you better colors through the glass but is damned annoying imo because it's hard to see things in a well-lit room or with sunlight hitting the screen unless you jack the brightness up, and even then the problem isn't totally solved.

Matte gets rid of all those problems but doesn't allow color through the glass as well (although it's not bad at all!).

Semi-glossy offers the best of both worlds. A little reflective and a little matte, but not reflective enough to be noticeable in normal lighting and not matte enough to impede color penetration through the glass.

Using a TV vs Monitor pros and cons if any?

I couldn't give you a scientific explanation for using a monitor instead of a TV, but I have seen an equal-size and resolution TV and a monitor side-by-side and the monitor blew it away in image quality. Not that the TV was bad. The monitor was just a lot better.

Which brands should I consider over others?

As for brands, any will do really. ASUS, ACER, HP, Dell, LG, Viewsonic, and BenQ are all great brands.


EDIT:

If you're considering 120Hz or 144Hz screens, which means you're also thinking of a GPU setup powerful enough to benefit from those screens, I would consider getting a Korean 1440p monitor instead from QNIX, XSTAR, or Yamakasi. You can find them on Newegg, Amazong, or eBay. They're generally much cheaper than mainstream 1440p monitors like those from ASUS or Dell, and if you don't mind overseas shipping and the somewhat higher risk of needing an RMA, then they're a great way to get higher resolution displays for less money. And they're all 60Hz with some sort of IPS or PLS technology (PLS is practically the same as IPS in terms of image quality).

You can find some that are overclockable (yeah, overclockable monitors..) to 96Hz or 120Hz, but they're a lot more expensive because those are no longer bargains. They're specialties, since no mainstream monitors are like them. So the bargain disappears :P

I'd get one from eBay because that's the only place where you can find "pixel perfect" ones. Not guaranteed to be pixel perfect, but they do go through more screening than non-pixel perfect models. Green_sum is a well-known seller for them.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What power supply do I need?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

You'll be fine running fully overclocked on a 500W PSU. Dual card setups are hard-pressed to break 500W (although it's cutting it very close) so you're absolutely fine.

The only thing I would think about is that PSUs are most efficient at 50% or 80% load depending on the unit in question.

I'd go with a good 700 or 750W PSU to take advantage of that and have a little headroom for drives, fans, etc.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS Rampage IV Black x79"

  • 75 months ago
  • 0 points

No way, is that whole I/O cover a heatsink?? That's kind of cool haha. I was wondering what they would do since they removed the fan on the PCH.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Msi gtx 670 pe oc vs amd r9 280x (help)"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

The R9 280X is the better card. It performs like a 770 (which performs like a 680). Crossfire I know has some issues with stuttering and frame times, but I don't know very much about it, and tons of people run Crossfire setups so I'm not sure how enormous a problem it is or isn't.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16gb 8x2 or 4x4 for video editing?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

You're correct. But the board only runs in dual channel at most. But for boards that do support quad channel memory (which means getting at least 4 sticks) you can also run in dual channel if you really wanted to. It just comes down to how much expansion you want and how much RAM you're able to afford/want at one time.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16gb 8x2 or 4x4 for video editing?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

There's a pretty good chance they'll just run at their rated speeds automatically. If not, the next easiest thing to do would be to set "XMP" in the BIOS. If that doesn't work, you'll have manually select what speed, what voltage, what timings, etc for every number. Which is easy, but takes more time than...well, none, or XMP.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Stone, a work in progress. Seeking constructive criticism."

  • 75 months ago
  • 4 points

Looks great overall, but just a couple notes.

The PSU is bit mismatched when you consider the GPU and motherboard together. You've gone Nvidia on a Sabertooth, which means you won't be able to run more than 2 cards in the future. With that in mind, I'd stick to the 750W or 650W PSU range for 2 reasons: PSUs are most efficient at either 50% or 80% load depending on the model in question, and a dual 780 system won't draw more than 500W on a fully overclocked system. You could do that or keep the PSU and change the board to one that supports 3 way SLI.

The CPU cooler comes with thermal paste pre-applied to the block.

Lastly, 16GB of RAM is overkill unless you're doing rendering, video editing, or virtualization. These days it's not really futureproofing to get max density sticks in dual channel (2x8GB). By the time games will need more than 8GB of RAM, we'll likely be in (at least) the DDR4 days anyways, so futureproofing now with DDR3 memory doesn't really make sense since by the time you'd need to upgrade a 2x4GB setup, you'd be getting DDR4 sticks. For gaming it's always a better idea to get higher speed RAM than more RAM. It doesn't make a huge difference, but it at least makes a difference whereas more RAM does not.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "need help building a machine"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1SewI

Basically it's Ryne's build but lowering the CPU and increasing the GPU (in terms of performance). Also a different motherboard since SLI is no longer a future-proofing consideration with that GPU. You can still get 990FX if you need other chipset features though.

Depends on what you need more: CPU power or GPU power.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16gb 8x2 or 4x4 for video editing?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

Those have very nice timings but are a little expensive.

I like these more for the money: http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gskill-memory-f31866c9d16gxm

But if there's nothing else that your money could be spent on, then yeah that RAM is just fine. The only thing I guess is that it's red even though your motherboard is blue :P

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Never built a gaming PC before, need help on build!"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Here you go!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor $199.99 @ Microcenter
CPU Cooler Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $84.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard Asus Maximus VI Hero ATX LGA1150 Motherboard $189.99 @ NCIX US
Memory G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $72.00 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk $174.99 @ NCIX US
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.98 @ Outlet PC
Video Card Asus Radeon R9 280X 3GB Video Card $316.13 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Define R4 w/Window (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case $89.99 @ Newegg
Case Fan Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan $15.98 @ Outlet PC
Case Fan Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan $15.98 @ Outlet PC
Case Fan Corsair Air Series AF140 Quiet Edition 67.8 CFM 140mm Fan $15.98 @ Outlet PC
Case Fan Corsair CO-9050014-WW 62.7 CFM 120mm Fan $26.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair 760W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply $115.49 @ Newegg
Optical Drive Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer $56.23 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 8.1 - OEM (64-bit) $99.98 @ Outlet PC
Monitor Asus PB238Q 23.0" Monitor $193.58 @ Newegg
Monitor Asus PB238Q 23.0" Monitor $193.58 @ Newegg
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available. $1921.85
Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-10-23 10:18 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I get some advice on my build?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

Always, always always always buy your own PSU unless you're getting one with a case that comes from a well-known PSU maker. An example would be the EVGA Hadron (@everybody in the know, their PSU's aren't bad nowadays :P). Corsair, Seasonic, NZXT, PC Power & Cooling, Enermax, Antec, Cooler Master, and Fractal Design all make great power supplies.

Just be sure to get one that is at least 80+ Bronze rated and if you can afford it, semi modular. Worth considering is that PSUs are most efficient at either 50% or 80% of their rated wattage depending on the PSU in question, so depending on what your system wattage is you can factor that in and buy a PSU with extra wattage to take advantage of that higher efficiency at load.


Just as my rule of thumb you won't need a dedicated sound card unless you're packing at least $200+ worth of speakers or $150+ worth of headphones. Below that level of equipment, the equipment is much more of a quality bottleneck than the audio processing.


For a WiFi card I recommend the ASUS PCE-N15. I've bought two of them, one for both of my builds, and they work without a hitch. They're fairly low profile (completely hidden if you put them underneath a GPU) and very reliable from what reviews can show. The cheaper N10 and more expensive N53 both have nightmare reviews compared to the N15, which seems like the sweet spot.


I would get either Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit or Windows 8 64bit. You won't need the Pro versions unless you have specific tasks you want to do or you're using more than 16GB of RAM on Windows 7. Whatever you pick, get OEM to save money.


Thermal compound will be pre-applied to the cooler that Intel provides in the CPU box, so you do not need anymore paste.


As for your build in general, you've made some great choices imo. The only things I see are the PSU in the case and also the motherboard. I would get an H87 motherboard at least. If you think you might get another 650 Ti BOOST in the future, you should get a Z87 board, because you can't SLI on any non-Z motherboard.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Concerned about airflow and space"

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

The 550D is perfectly fine for a dual card setup. Just make sure to always have 2 fans in the front.

If you're concerned about the case trapping heat, consider a Rosewill Blackhawk mid tower. It's made almost entirely of mesh I think, and it comes with a ton of fans. For the price I'm not sure it can be beat in terms of cooling.

For a minimalistic style case for less, try the Fractal Design Define R4 (I would buy another 140mm front fan if you get it).

For a more aggressively styled case, there's the Cooler Master Storm Scout 2.

All of those are my top recommendations for cases between $50 and $100. They cover pretty much every end of the spectrum.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16gb 8x2 or 4x4 for video editing?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

Check the specs on ASUS' actual product page. PCPP has it wrong - the board supports 32GB of RAM.

So for that reason, 100% 2x8GB!

1866 with 1 DPC means that you need at least one stick of RAM in each channel in order to get performance equal to the rated speeds of your sticks. Basically it means you need at least 2 sticks, and they need to be in the right slots. Any multiple of 2 sticks will work just fine.

On that note though, I would stick to 2x8GB DDR3-1600 memory with latency CAS 9 or lower unless you can find a higher speed kit that is on sale for cheaper. You will not see much, if any performance increase from using higher speed RAM. At least, not enough of a performance increase to make it worth it.

The only situations where I would buy higher speed RAM are:

1)You find a cheaper option than lower speed.

2)You have a couple bucks left in your budget and there's nothing else that could benefit from the saved money - and you don't want to save the extra money.

Faster RAM should always be a sale or last option buy unless you have a massive budget or are building an APU system.

Lastly, what programs are you thinking of using? If you use Premiere Pro or After Effects CS6 you'll want an Nvidia card for PP's MPE and AE's GPU acceleration and raytracing.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The R9 290X is a monster, especially in Uber Mode"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

There's enough inconsistency for me to be extremely skeptical about these "results". There's just no way that, optimization or not, two Titans aren't chugging out 150+ FPS at 1080p in Hitman. Let alone performing worse than cards that together cost $1500 less.

I give it a "mislabeled" at the very best.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "IS there any hope?"

  • 75 months ago
  • 3 points

If you were willing to pay for some more DDR RAM (not DDR3, not DDR2, just DDR :D ) then you'd probably have a better time with internet browsing.

I used a Pentium 4 2.4GHz with 2x512MB of DDR memory until mid 2012 when my parents bought me a laptop as a graduation gift. Was able to run LoL at around 30 fps at 1600x900 with an ATI X800 SE (that's right, back in the ATI days, not AMD!)... So a decent machine for being so old. It was alright with browsing and word processing, but not any of those and LoL at the same time.

Best ways to spruce it up would be to add more RAM, clean and reapply thermal paste to the CPU (the old paste is probably a rock by now), and maybe add an SSD.

EDIT: The X800 SE is a PCI-E card, so in theory modern cards, while you may have to check on bandwidth requirements, may at least fit on your motherboard if it has a slot. Don't quote me on that, but just know that such motherboards did exist.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Amd vs Nvidia"

  • 75 months ago
  • 1 point

Wait until release, look at post-release benchmarks of FPS, frame times, fan noise, and heat output, and then just get what's in your budget unless you need a specific GPU for a specific task (like Premiere Pro CS6 + Nvidia). Pretty simple.

Numbers won't lie to you.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The R9 290X is a monster, especially in Uber Mode"

  • 75 months ago
  • 2 points

http://cdn2.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/R9-290X_Hitman-Absolution-1080.jpg

I'd wait until release to believe benchmarks.

There's no way a single R9 290X, "Uber Mode" or not, beats TWO Titans and FOUR (FOUR!) 7970's but doesn't beat two 7950's...

http://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/R9-290X_R9-290X_-Crysis-3-Eyefinity.jpg

Or beats three 760's but not two 7950's...

I mean come on, the results are obviously fake, mislabeled, or from a cow's ***..

Comment reply on broj_jedan's Completed Build: White Beauty

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

ATH-M50WH fist bump!

It's you and me bro. Only 2 so far on PCPP! The headphones are amazing aren't they? The only problem I've got is the ear pads are starting to crack after just 6 months of use, and I clean them every time I take them off.

Also I like your decision to get the 4771 since you don't want to OC.

Comment reply on Reid_L's Completed Build: Epsilon v1.2 (High end gaming pc)(4.7ghz!!)

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

What are your ambient temps, what voltage are you on, and what do you stress with? Those are fantastic 4.7GHz H100i temps!

My 4770K reaches into the mid 80's at 1.3V/4.7GHz looping Cinebench under an H100i. And you are so lucky for hitting above 4.5GHz using >1866 RAM!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrading to 32GB of RAM for After Effects CS6, need to upgrade my OS - Win7 Pro or Win8.1?"

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

I know that - that's why I started this thread lol

Comment reply on hitek's Completed Build: 3770 "Budget" Build

  • 76 months ago
  • 3 points

The prices for the CPU, CPU cooler, PSU, and keyboard are flat out amazing! The hunting was good I see lol

Clean build, solid parts, and awesome price tag! I'd look into upgrading the CPU cooler at some point, but hey for what you've got for 7 bucks who can argue right?

Comment reply on LeMonarque's Completed Build: VALKYRIE - Stryker, 4770K, Sabertooth Z87, GTX 780, H100i

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem! This was my first build and I can't tell you how many times I got frustrated when a source didn't explain all the info given lol. Picking up fragments of info and putting them together was the most annoying thing! So I try to be concise, even if it means I type a wall of text :P

That's an interesting CPU cooler setup you mentioned. Whether or not it hinders airflow depends on the rest of the system.

For example:

Since the cooler is angled down toward the front, a rear fan as exhaust would hurt the airflow to the cooler but help the exhaust of hot air from the GPU if the GPU has a dual/triple fan cooler. This would help direct as much of the hot GPU air away from the cooler as possible.

On the flip side, turning that fan around as an intake helps feed fresh air to the CPU, but also blows hot GPU air into the cooler as well if a the GPU has a dual/triple fan cooler.

So it's kind of a mixed bag. I think you would just have to test both rear fan setups in real life to see which worked best for what you want to run cooler - the CPU or the GPU. Or possibly both.

For clarification, dual and triple fan GPUs exhaust air out every crevice in the card, while single-fan, also called 'reference' or 'blower' have closed unibody coolers and exhaust hot air directly out of the PCI bracket (but don't cool the GPU as well as dual/triple fan versions).

Lastly, Noctua has a good diagram that tells you which fans are for what for their 120mm lineup. You can find the info on any 120mm fan page of their website. Corsair also has segmented fans for specific purposes. Their SP fans are for Static Pressure, and their AF fans are for Air Flow.

You can tell a static pressure fan from others because they have either 7 wide, steep angle of attack blades or many narrow blades with steep angles of attack. Examples of the first type would be Noctua's NF-F12 and Corsair's SP120 (incredibly wide blades), while the second type would be something like a Swiftech Helix or a Scythe Gentle Typhoon.

Corsair AF120 and AF140 fans have many narrow blades, but a shallower angle of attack, which is designates them as airflow fans. Noctua NF-S12A FLX fans have steep angled blades, but they're narrower than those on the NF-F12.

In reality though, I think basically any fan with bad static pressure is an airflow fan, because it means the fan disperses air. There are some fans with specific airflow designs though, like the ones mentioned above.

Comment reply on LeMonarque's Completed Build: VALKYRIE - Stryker, 4770K, Sabertooth Z87, GTX 780, H100i

  • 76 months ago
  • 3 points

Hi, thanks so much!

For my PSU I got these from Performance-PCs: Corsair White Sleeved 24-pin compatible with AX760 and Corsair White Sleeved Cable Set compatible with AX760.

Unlike cable extensions, they're made by Corsair to fit the specific pinouts needed by their power supplies. If I used extensions I'd have to use the stock black cables or sleeved them myself.

As for your second question, I just filled up the fan slots on the case, but used fans optimized for different airflows to get the flow vectoring right.

I have 3 front fans. The bottom-most one is a static pressure optimized Noctua NF-F12 PWM. I also have 2 fans on the bottom of my case - one is an airflow optimized Noctua NF-S12A FLX and the other is also an airflow optimized Corsair AF120 High Performance Edition.

Airflow optimized fans are meant to move a lot of air and disperse it widely. Static pressure fans are meant to forcefully propel air in a (ideally) steady, pipe-shaped column in whatever direction the fan is facing.

So while more air is blown with an airflow optimized fan, the strength of the airflow in that imaginary 120mm cylinder in front of the fan is weak because the air is dispersed in such a large area. That's why when you stick your hand in front of a desk fan your hand gets buffeted instead of steadily blown against. The flow is uneven.

The flat, strong airflow from my NF-F12 PWM shoots 90 degrees against the airflow from my two bottom fans, which blow air straight up. When the two forces collide, the air is vectored at an angle. That angle allows me to feed air directly to the fans on my GPU.

Since this was posted I've also gotten some full-metal expansion slot plates for the expansion slots underneath my GPU except for the one directly under. Covering the lower slots with hole-less plates means that none of my intake air from the bottom and front can escape out the back. Instead if rebounds into the GPU fans. The slot right underneath the GPU I've left completely empty so that there is a hole for the fan to intake air from the rear.

Using static pressure fans on the bottom would feed the GPU better, because no air would be "wasted" in dispersion to the rest of the case. However I chose airflow fans for the bottom because I also want extra airflow to my H100i, and the dispersion helps do that.

Sorry for the wall of text! If you read all of that, grab yourself a cookie and pat yourself on the back :D

Comment reply on se7en9057's Completed Build: White Knight

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

Yup vectoring airflow diagonally is exactly what I did with my Stryker. Except I just loaded the bottom fans and put 1 static pressure fan on the lower HDD bay to do that lol. It really does make a difference.

Comment reply on odracirstark's Completed Build: Sexy Lady.

  • 76 months ago
  • 3 points

Damn, I didn't even notice the 7850 was 4GB! Man...

Also I really hate how the formatting puts text underneath bullet points. Phillip please :D

Comment reply on odracirstark's Completed Build: Sexy Lady.

  • 76 months ago
  • 1 point

or the board

Put in both choices because who knows what kind of obsessions OP has if the listed parts were chosen. I agree completely. But when a guy drops on a Sabertooth 990FX, 16GB of RAM for gaming, and a kilowatt PSU with one GPU, you kind of have to wonder.

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