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Comment reply on codyrush's Completed Build: Erakis - The Garnet Star 2.0

  • 71 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah, they always tell you to buy the sticks together nowadays, so what if you need more later? Too bad, buy all new? Hopefully it's still available then. In the past I bought 2 sticks of memory expecting to be able to buy 2 more sticks later, and I did that twice and it worked fine, but it seems like that's not the best way to go now.

Comment reply on HikingMike's Completed Build: Monster Bunny gaming machine

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks a lot, I'll look into that.

Comment reply on Sohrab's Completed Build: AMD Budget Gaming Build

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

They cost a little more maybe but I've been loyal to them ever since I discovered they were the most quiet and efficient (and reliable) PSUs out there back when computers were really noisy and there wasn't anything 80 PLUS out there, and I was trying to keep my computer quiet since it was in the same small room I slept in at college (~2002). That was right when Seasonic made its first retail products after being OEM only before. Silentpcreview.com was one of my favorite computers sites then, hehe. I wish this PCPartPicker site was around back when I was doing some funny custom stuff just to get my computer silent.

Anyway, I also wanted to say since you're 14, good luck with everything and don't let the money get you down. I'm sure you'll be able to put more into computers later on if you want to. For now, nobody wants the older stuff so it can be pretty cheap if you carefully lurk Craigslist and ebay and this works just fine for some components. But you already have pretty much everybody on this site beat if you could build your own computer with $800 at your age. I didn't have $800, and my family probably just got our first computer about that time.

Comment reply on jetbeck's Completed Build: Mini ITX - Main Computer 2014 Update

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok, in that case I'll post it and ignore naysayers :)

Comment reply on Sohrab's Completed Build: AMD Budget Gaming Build

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok good luck!!

Comment reply on Levyrat's Completed Build: Honor Thy Mother on the Cheap

  • 71 months ago
  • 4 points

+1 Accessory drawer, hah

How does XP work with that SSD so far?

I'd recommend the Malwarebytes Anti-Malware lifetime license for ~$12.49. Best thing I did for my parents' XP computer... 4 years ago http://slickdeals.net/f/6781258-malwarebytes-anti-malware-pro-lifetime-1-pc-oem-for-12-49-newegg-with-promo-code-ymmv-free-shipping

Comment reply on jetbeck's Completed Build: Mini ITX - Main Computer 2014 Update

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

I do like the look of that case. I saw a cool Bitfenix, forgot the name, that would have been great for a somewhat mobile case with those handles, but there were some negatives and cooling wasn't the best. Of course price.

Comment reply on jetbeck's Completed Build: Mini ITX - Main Computer 2014 Update

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Is it bad form to post a build that's not new? For example, I have a parts list of my computer I built in Jan 2011 on here just for having a nice part list in one place, and for completeness. I thought might as well put it up since I put up the recent one I did. If that's not cool, then I'll leave it as just a list and not make it a completed build, even though it has been completed for a while.

Comment reply on Sohrab's Completed Build: AMD Budget Gaming Build

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

GTX 760 is good too, newer, and can be had for a bit over $200 during sales/rebates. Mine was $270 with a $40 rebate and a bundled card from Nvidia with codes for 2 games which I sold on ebay for $20... so effectively ~$210 for me.

Comment reply on Sohrab's Completed Build: AMD Budget Gaming Build

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Not all Corsairs, unless that has changed recently http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-oem-manufacturer,2913-5.html (2013)

Comment reply on Sohrab's Completed Build: AMD Budget Gaming Build

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Seasonic. I haven't seen one die yet and we have a bunch of old ones at work that already had lived in HP workstations in past lives. And of course, many PSUs for other brands are also made by Seasonic. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-oem-manufacturer,2913.html

Comment reply on Sohrab's Completed Build: AMD Budget Gaming Build

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

I can borrow a "Kill-A-Watt" meter from our library here to see actual usage, though I haven't yet tried it. Most people think they use more than they do, but I think people are becoming more informed on this lately. Newegg has a PSU tool that gives you a guess of how much power you'll need.

Comment reply on HikingMike's Completed Build: Monster Bunny gaming machine

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep, it's pretty awesome, and that she herself games. I was definitely surprised to hear that when I first learned of it. I always thought that the term "LAN Party" was so ridiculous. However, the gaming kicks butt. 15 people in a garage shooting each other in-game is a riot. My eyeballs (dry) and my stomach (overkill on the unhealthy food) aren't happy for a while but it passes. The biggest hassle is making sure everyone has the correct games in question and right version etc., and breaking down and setting up comps. And of course everyone has to keep their computers updated enough for the new games. However it's down to a science now, also Steam helps, though our games are more expensive now with us getting a new COD every other year. Friday night is setup, then Saturday is gaming all day til late.

We have mixed up the games more in the past, but the games were cheaper then. We do play an older RC racing game called Re-Volt which is hilarious. And there is BZFlag which is old-school looking tank game that's free/open source and it's pretty funny playing these also. We're on the lookout for other games that are free or cheap and are great for LAN play, but it seems like LAN play isn't really considered much by game developers anymore unfortunately.

Comment reply on HikingMike's Completed Build: Monster Bunny gaming machine

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually the new Call of Duty Ghosts requires a little more horsepower. There have been some very critical reviews because of this because the game isn't changed all that much to warrant such a big increase in system requirements. I can attest that it runs way worse than the previous one we had MW3.

link here

I did quite a bit of tweaking of settings, upgrading CPU a bit, and overclocking and still wasn't satisfied with the Core 2 Duo we had previously. As for other games, COD is plenty for me as I don't have a ton of time and don't feel like buying that many games. I like the shoot-em-up action in COD also. I previously played a lot of Quake 3, otherwise it was mostly Age of Empires for me.

Comment reply on HikingMike's Completed Build: Monster Bunny gaming machine

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Cool thanks. Ah that Crucial article probably got it for you. It's important for SSD drives. I'll also note that if you're planning to have an SSD for OS/programs drive and hard disk for data or something, you'll want to keep the hard disk unplugged during Windows installation so that Windows won't put something on the hard disk at that time. Otherwise you'll find out if you ever take the hard disk out or erase it and then your computer won't boot. Annoying.

Comment reply on HikingMike's Completed Build: Monster Bunny gaming machine

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the comment! Hehe, yes I expected a comment like this. I probably should have put something in my description. I totally agree generally with not getting more power than you need or will need as you do lose efficiency by going big. I ended up with the 850watt for a couple reasons. 1. I needed a new PSU since the others I had weren't strong enough. 2. On my system (not this one which is my wife's), I have a Radeon HD 6950 and was thinking about buying another for Crossfire eventually as a cheap mid-life upgrade since my mobo can do 2 x16 PCI Express. My PSU in that is 620 I think, and wouldn't have been enough judging from the newegg PSU tool. So I was thinking 750 at least which was about the border of my system with two 6950s. Then on newegg, the price of the 850 was same as the 750 for a short time when I bought it so I just bought that one.

When I discovered the price of used 6950s blew up with everything else, I kind of gave up on that for now and I just stuck the 850watt PSU in the new computer rather than pull out the one I have nicely set up in my computer and swap that. So maybe I'll swap the PSUs someday still.

I did end up unlocking my 6950's extra shaders and overclocking a bit, almost to full 6970, and that did help some.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "HIS H695F2G2M (Radeon HD 6950 2GB video card)"

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

Sweet, thanks

Comment reply on Forum Topic "HIS H695F2G2M (Radeon HD 6950 2GB video card)"

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

Got it, thanks!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS M4A89TD PRO/USB3 motherboard"

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok cool. I am a bit new to PCPartPicker and that makes sense. I was hoping stuff like that would still be pickable. Thanks!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Recommendations? CPU, MOBO, Memory combo for under $700?"

  • 72 months ago
  • 2 points

Do you live near a Microcenter? :) Great CPU+Mobo combos. Since you're replacing the mobo too, I would not consider a 3770k since the newer CPUs (Haswell) are on a new socket, and will be for the next generation as well (Broadwell). That just gives you an upgrade option in case you want it. Consider a 4670k if you don't want to go all the way to 4770k. Most applications, and gaming, won't see hardly any difference, and GPU is almost always the bottleneck in gaming anyway.

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add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube