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realistic overclocking benefits

jase78
  • 60 months ago

Hello all. As a new pc builder I've been very interested in the process of overclocking my 4690k. I've read hundreds of guides and tutorials explaining the basics on doing such things. I guess what I really want to know is, are there a real day to day benefits of doing this. I understand there's a few CPU intensive games that benefit but I'm talking about as a whole are there real gains from overclocking for gaming and daily computing on a system with a mid range gpu such as a 970? If so could you give examples such as , massive fps differences from o.c. to stock? Or is it more of a hobby to overclcock or just for bragging rights Ect.?

Comments

  • 60 months ago
  • 3 points

First off the gtx 970 isn't mid range. Second Overclocking will generally not affect general day-to-day computing like web browsing.

  • 60 months ago
  • 2 points

Overclocking CPU for multi-threaded workload productvity:
- Real benefits, worthwhile

Overclocking CPU for gaming:
- Bragging rights, not worthwhile

  • 60 months ago
  • 1 point

Overclocking can remove bottlenecks in CPU-intensive games, like you said, but it's honestly mostly for bragging rights, and it's dangerous and generally not a good idea unless you know what you're doing, you're willing to take the risk, and you actually need to.

  • 60 months ago
  • 1 point

I had a feeling about it being more for bragging rights. I've found so much about how to overclock and it seems like everyone does, but have found very little about real world impacts on gaming that make it seem worth it. In fact ,it seems like the corporations stepped in and found ways to profit imensly from it defeating the original purpuse. .wasn't the whole point originally so you could purchase a cheaper ,slower chip, yet have equal or better performance? Now the "k" chips cost more right ? Also the boards and the cooling solutions needed. That said, it still sounds fun and I will still probably mess around with it a bit.

  • 60 months ago
  • 1 point

There's no point for daily use yet. As the system gets older and software gets more demanding, then there will be a big benefit. It's basically a good way to go longer before an upgrade

  • 60 months ago
  • 1 point

jase78, I was asking myself the same question and came to the conclusions mentioned in your topic :)

talby, what is a burn in??

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