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QVL “Native”?

ktran714

8 months ago

I recently checked the QVL of the motherboard that I wanna use for my upcoming build to see which brands of RAM it supports and I decided to pick the G. Skill 4133mhz. I wanna know what “native” refers to on that list. Does native refer to the “out-of-the-box” speed of the RAM and 4133mhz would be the overclockable rate?

Thanks.

Comments

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

could you link what exactly your looking for? i can most likely figure it out if i can see what your looking at

i will say that almost all motherboards run the RAM at a lower clock speed when you plug it in, and then allow you to change it to the advertised clock speed in the bios. This is what i think its referring to, the native speed being the initial clock speed.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Sure. The RAM I wanna use is the second G. Skill from the first box on the list.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

here an explination "Native is the value the RAM runs at without XMP enabled or overclocking. As you have seen, most DDR4 runs natively at 2133 and higher speeds require XMP or overclocking."

so basically it's just to ensure compatibility on boot, because most ram clocks to just under their advertised speed, (like 50-200 mHz difference)

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Keep in mind that achievable RAM speed is probably more about your luck with the CPU than the motherboard. (A bad mobo can impede your best RAM speed, but a good one can't make the CPU or RAM go faster.)

I assume this is an Intel CPU build?

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah it’s gonna be an intel build. I’ve already decided to buy a delidded i9-9900K from SiliconLottery that’s gonna run at 5ghz out of the box so idk if that will surely help the RAM run at those speed. But if that’s the case should I go for a 4000mhz or something even lower then?

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

It's your money. You definitely get into diminishing returns; e.g. the transfer rate difference between 4000 and 4133 MT/s is something like 3%, so the overall system improvement even assuming a memory intensive program is likely to be under 1%. If you want to push the computer for all it's worth, go for it - you can always manually run the faster rated memory at a slightly slower clock if need be.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh ok.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

IMC and core quality are entirely separate

Your motherboard also plays a huge role on memory overclocking

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

IMC and core quality are entirely separate

Technically I suppose that's at least arguable, but since it's all on the same chip, they go together - it's not like you can keep the CPU cores and try different IMC's. So I just said "CPU" to keep it simple.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

It’s the JEDEC bin that it’s using (I’m guessing).

Since Skylake (and other architects based on it) only support up to JEDEC 2666, I wouldn’t worry.

Now Zen 2 will support up to the 3200 JEDEC bin, which means if your RAM supports it on that CPU, it will default to it instead of 2133, etc.

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