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Outside cooling in winter?

adamboyce556

11 months ago

Hey there guys. I’m looking into a little experiment using an old pc I salvaged from my school’s scrap bin, where I want to try two things. First thing is test standard air cooling when I have an input ambient temperature of about -3° C. And compare temps to standards. Another, is a physical cooling of a cpu using snow xD yes yes I know that sounds stupid, but hear me out. I have a liquivac that will be sucking out water as the snow melts from CPU temps, and basically a long tube with snow being put in the top. In all honesty this a project for the complete fun of it, I expect no results to come from this, but does anyone know of anything similar ever being done involving sub-zero temps with solids.

How it is gonna work is a passive cooler with a custom bracket, with a long vertical tube which will be packed with snow, and have something continually pushing the snow in contact with the heat sink fins.

It’s a joke don’t take this seriously, but should I try it and document it here?

Comments

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Try throwing together a cheap cordon loop with a 360-430 mm rad, and put it outside. An LN2 pot is what you you seem to be looking for with the snow thing. But honestly without being able to overclock there’s no point in this.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

As I said I was doing it out of boredom lol, it’s more of a joke than an actual test

[comment deleted]
  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

The water wouldn’t be subzero (cause it would be ice) so condensation isn’t really an issue, but I’m still going to have something to soak it up

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Of course, it wouldn't be subzero. The temperature difference from colder to warmer causes condensation.

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