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Scared Of Worshiping Jesus.

LaserNut123o
  • 21 months ago

I’m still young and so I have many issues with how I worship my Saviour Jesus Christ. I’m scared that if I mistep somewhere bad, I will go to hell. I’m scared if my parents die without repenting, they will go to hell. I’m scared of being left out at the rapture and dying on earth being left behind. I’m scared that the Devil may decieve me. I’m scared this anxiety will haunt me forever. I want to know how to deal with this. How to get me and my family into Heaven. I want this anxiety to end. I know that this isn’t a topic I should display here, on a website where people enjoy there lives building computers and making graphic card suggestions, but I’m just trying to help myself escape this fear. ANY answers are GREATLY appreciated in advance. May Jesus Christ Bless all of you. Amen.

Comments

  • 21 months ago
  • 8 points

Here are a few tips I have:

  1. Faith is not dependent on works alone. If you do something bad, repent and attempt to stay away from the problem again. If you can't on your own, keep praying about it, and get help from a family member or a friend. If you're a Christian, you should be fine, really. Just keep yourself away from those temptations.

  2. It's true: if your parents don't repent, they won't go to heaven with you. You should really try your hardest to lead them to the faith, but if you can't on your own, trust God. Pray to Him to show your parents the Way, and lay it in His hands.

  3. The Devil will try to deceive you, but if you spend time reading the Bible and praying, then how can he deceive you? If you're surrounded by the Word and the goodness of It, then what is there to deceive you of? That God isn't real? But you believe He is. So why should Satan telling you otherwise convince you otherwise? You, as a Christian, know what his position is. If you feel you are being deceived, again, pray about it. Talk to a pastor or somebody at your church to help you through it.

  4. I've been haunted by some of this anxiety. It's not fun. Sometimes I wonder if there really is a God. But I have to trust that there is. And you know what? I've said this before: I'd rather live as if there is a God to find out there isn't than to live if there wasn't a God and find out there is. It would be better to chase this as a mindless game to find out that it was all fake than to be opinionated about it not being real to find out in the End that there really was a God the whole time.

All that goes to say, trust in God. Pour your problems into Him, and ask Him to show you the Truth about this. Talk with your parents, and go to church. As a Baptist chaplain's kid, I am positive that this should be a help to you. God bless!

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

This is very good advice

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! Glad you think so! I really tried my best to give good advice, and I'm happy to see that people think I did.

  • 21 months ago
  • 5 points

I’m scared that if I mistep somewhere bad, I will go to hell.

As others have implied, if one misstep is enough to send you to everlasting damnation, is this person actually a being who loves you? If you are operating under the assumption that your god is good, then this fear is plainly unreasonable.

This is another great example of why organized religion is damaging and should be left behind.

  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

Excellently worded and totally agree. Was about to comment the same.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

One misstep isn't enough for damnation. As long as you trugs in God and have been Saved by Him, you're good. All your sins are wiped away. However, God still does frown upon sins and the like, so staying away from the things that help you give into sinful temptations is always a good idea. Like I said: a single misstep isn't enough for your life to forever be damned.

  • 21 months ago
  • 4 points

Just live your life treating others with respect and dignity. Help those in need and remember it's okay to make mistakes. You believe in God and Jesus, so believe that god made humans flawed. He created the capability for mistakes and through his love created atonement. My personal opinion is that if you believe your god to be benevolent, then you and your family will be forgiven. Anxiety about the end of life is normal, religious or not we all have that thought in our mind but know this, you're loved, by your creator, your family and friends.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you very much for the answer. I will for sure take this into consideration that my creator loves me and there is nothing to worry about. God Bless You.✌

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

I'm not religious so my point was not from a biblical perspective, he didn't ask for a biblical perspective.

"ANY answers are GREATLY appreciated in advance."

And btw if god is such a divine creator, a creator of all reality, he most certainly did make us flawed because by his omnipotent nature whether intentional or not humanity is his creation. So if humanity is flawed (like we both agree) then he must have created us flawed.

I tend to believe (just for my own sanity) that whatever god people choose to believe in is a loving god so he's willing to accept mistakes.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

Well no, by his own omnipotence, whether directly or indirectly he has to have created humans flawed. Unless the argument is that he never wanted us to be flawed, he gave us 'free will' (without understanding the ramifications) and then went "oops, well now they've sinned". This would make him not omniscient

I can see the argument that he knew the entire time what 'free will' would accomplish and he was okay with us being sinful and then pledging faith. However then why seem surprised that humans sin? Why bother with the whole "OMG EVE U *****! you totally betrayed me".

Shouldn't he have foreseen every possible eventuality within the spectrum of his own creation?

  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

Most of the time i will not in anyway comment on posts that are religion or political in nature.

But I am going to leave those two things out of this comment, and say it just like this. You be the best person you can be.. you will make mistakes, and that is just human nature, and in the end, regardless of your beliefs you will be fine.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

If you reject Him then God must punish you for your sins

If God is indeed God, he does not have to punish you. An all powerful being does not have to follow any rules, so he chooses to punish you.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

Sending good people to Hell just because they don't believe in him, or his son is not justice. Sounds rather selfish.

  • 21 months ago
  • 4 points

Petty is the word I would use.

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

I think it is pretty obvious he doesn't hate to punish people.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

God, in his righteousness, must punish you.

Who are you, a mortal, to say was God must do?

  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

Best way to escape that irrational fear is to realize that you are fearful of things that don't even exist. That fear is a product of manipulation by someone who is exerting control over you. Listen to your rational mind, not the irrational fears others put into you.

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

You could start by reading the Bible, and have family devotions. Find a pastor that's able to introduce you and your family to a church. If you're scared of being deceived and being left out of the rupture, then pray and have faith. There is no reason to be afraid of the things you have said, as long as you follow Him and obey Him, you'll be fine.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

But how? How do I show my faith in God?

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Like what I said above. If you want to show your faith for God, learn new things (i.e. an instrument or really, technically anything) and use those learnings for the glory of God.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

ANY answers are GREATLY appreciated in advance.

I have no doubt that I'll take some flak for this, but here's one option for your consideration:

Trivial solution: Fail to reject the following null hypothesis:

H0 = There is no god. There is no afterlife.

  • 21 months ago
  • 0 points

Prove it. BTW I’m not mad I just wanna know why you think this.

  • 21 months ago
  • 5 points

Well, how can you prove there is one? In the end, religion comes down to your mindset and what you believe as an individual. If you firmly believe that Christianity is the ultimate truth then go and preach it. Do your best to be the best Christian you can be. That's the only advice I have.

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

Suppose my friend Bertrand claims he lost a teapot. It's in orbit around the sun, with a typical orbital radius putting it somewhere between the Earth and Mars. Now, this is a very special teapot. Directly observing it is impossible, no matter how sensitive your instruments are.

Do you accept the existence of the teapot?

Further reading: Russell's teapot.

I have no interest in changing your position. However, doing some research into the philosophy of religion certainly wouldn't do you any harm, regardless of your beliefs. For example, you may find some of the past rebuttals to the arguments posed by Russell's teapot.

As you mentioned in your original post, engaging in debates regarding religious beliefs isn't why most users (including myself) visit this forum. You mentioned a problem that you cited as the cause for some anxiety, and I offered a possible solution. If you believe it does not suit your needs, that's perfectly fine. I wish you good luck with other solutions.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

While I understand the teapot analogy, I have to raise a quip; religion is not falsifiable and thus lies outside the realm of science. There are no testable predictions that can be made as to if there is or isn't a god. So, it's not really something that can be touched on aside from logical dissections and faith. That's the reason it's not anti-science to believe in a god. Just like it's not anti-religion to believe in the scientific method.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I have to raise a quip...

Can you explain why your response is best-addressed to me?

That's the reason it's not anti-science to believe in a god. Just like it's not anti-religion to believe in the scientific method.

I did not suggest either of those to be the case.

religion is not falsifiable and thus lies outside the realm of science.

Yes, if you follow Popper's interpretation, which is quite standard.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Because while Bertrand used the philosophical argument to explain why nobody would believe him simply because he said it was true doesn't necessarily touch the actual existence of said tea pot. Which, is what the OP was seaming to imply with their statements. So, I just saw it as tangential to the argument. But, perhaps it was simply a misinterpretation on my part.

I did not suggest either of those to be the case.

I didn't mean to imply that you did. It was just a assertion based on my previous sentences and not based off of yours. But, I can see where that could be deceptively phrased.

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 7 points

No the idea that the big bang came from nothing is not what scientists or philosophers agree on... (Well maybe some do). What's believed (By some physicists) is that the universe as we know it was created in an "empty space" (that's not really empty because the theory is that the space between particle formations is filled with energy) from a quantum fluctuation (Not gonna even try explaining this, I'm not smart enough to state anything on this space without heavy references).

The idea of something can't be created out of nothing is actually something that's been disproved (quantum vacuums, a state with no physical atoms). Now obviously it's not like scientists can tell us that there's not something Beyond the planes of reality (or if there even are different ones) however what they can do is observe our reality and have discovered such an existence ( A zero-state field).

So from a pure philosophical stance, Something coming from nothing doesn't seem possible. (The stance defining 'nothing' as having no properties at all) but from a scientific standing, it is possible.

I'm gonna end on the very popular argument "Pascal's Wager".

The benefits of believing that a god exists outweigh the disadvantages. Purely because there can only be two states, either one does or does not.

Obviously in terms of living amongst other humans, if your religion suggests violence, martyrdom or oppression of a populace, then I'd argue perhaps it's best not to practice your belief, but the belief is worth it.

  • 21 months ago
  • 7 points

Atheism has nothing to do with the origin of the universe. Atheism is merely a rejection of theism. One can arrive at atheism for a variety of reasons but that's the only thing that unifies them.

An atheist might feel they are required to explain the origins of life and/or the universe when posed the question, and they might even have their own beliefs or opinions, but in reality it is perfectly acceptable to say "I don't know." That is what is great about it: it's honest. It is perfectly fine to not know everything, and in fact most of us don't know much about most things, and that's ok. Yes there are scientists who study physics, astronomy, and cosmology, and attempt to probe further and further back in the history of the cosmos, but no scientist worth their salt will say to you "I definitively know". They will merely explain the prevailing science of the time. The theist, though, will claim knowledge that no one has.

Religions (and people in general) have a long and sordid history of explaining the unknown with make-believe and hocus pocus. With mathematics, experimentation, observation, and most importantly time, we've consistently and repeatedly disproved this hocus pocus. Given its track record, there is no basis for believing anything that is declared truth by a religion alone. Literally nothing has been proven through scripture, sermon, ritual, or prayer.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 5 points

That couldn't be farther from true. Obviously there is more to atheism then that, but it is a part of it. If you believe that there is no god, then everything has to have arrived by natural process, that is one of the main tenants of atheism.

I'm apparently gonna blow your mind but there are no "tenets of atheism" beyond being opposed to theism, which is the definition. There's no other binding belief or scripture, no hadith, no church or ministers, etc. That's it. Atheism makes no claims to the origin of the universe or to life or anything else.

I never stated that an atheist has to believe in the Big Bang, or any other theory

Actually you said:

Atheism: there was nothing and then there was, we do not understand this however, and it really makes no sense...

Theism: God created beginnings, thus explaining both the origin of the universe and God. This is a logical framework.

So you did explicitly make a claim as to what atheism supposedly entails in regards to the origins of the universe.

The point is that it is not possible for everything to have arrived by natural process

And MY point is that, you don't actually know this, and it is ok to not know this. Nobody does. Anyone who claims to is wrong, and more often than not is a theist.

there is still no reason for that matter to behave in any particular way, why should there be gravity? Sure we understand how gravity works, but why ought it to work that way? Why shouldn't objects repel each other instead?

This is something that theoretical physicists get to slowly prod at. But again, the answer is... we don't know! And that's ok.

the point isn't to prove anything though. If I pray its not to prove something, its to commune with God.

You did make a claim at "truth" though. You said:

Neither are scientific, but one is self-defeating (if there is nothing then there can only be nothing), and the other isn't, therefore the latter must be true. Unless if there is a third belief (that stuff exists not on its own but wasn't created), then theism must be accurate

This is not a logical conclusion. Just because you came up with two theories, theory A and theory B, and theory A doesn't make sense to you and/or is unproven, that does NOT in any way prove theory B to be "true" or "accurate".

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I almost completely agree with you. I never stated that an atheist has to believe in the Big Bang, or any other theory, I listed the Big Bang merely because it is the most prevalent theory. The point is that it is not possible for everything to have arrived by natural process, even if matter was created in total emptiness (which would be contrary to what I have been taught in public school, but maybe it can happen with crazy quantum stuff idk), there is still no reason for that matter to behave in any particular way, why should there be gravity? Sure we understand how gravity works, but why ought it to work that way? Why shouldn't objects repel each other instead?

In quantum mechanics you do see particles that spring from nothingness and return to it, normally very short lived. Hawking radiation has shown this to be the case. There are also many scientific theories on how the Universe came to be, none of them rely a God.

As for the why questions. That is not what science seeks to answer. Science looks to explain how gravity works, not why gravity is.

  • 21 months ago
  • 5 points

The whole premise of your argument of atheism is flawed.

Perhaps there was something that is simply not a God, and now there is something that's simply devoid of a God.

Perhaps there was nothing, and now there is still nothing.

Perhaps there was no time before something for nothing to be in and thus we simply are, in the same way that you believe the theist argument of a God being timeless in nature.

Perhaps there are more than 4 dimensions with which to o serve the idea of something or nothing beyond physical or time...

Perhaps the "God" of theists is actually that which we are part of on a micro level as we are on a small part of an atom which is part of a cell, which is part of something larger... Look to the stars and then to atomic structure and you'll see the truth to that easy enough.

Perhaps the concept of a God is itself what's flawed and by a theist definition they simply do not exist, though maybe something beyond out comprehension does exist and is simply not a God.

Perhaps all time and space is relative to the one imagining it and we are thus our own gods?

An atheist does not believe in God, but that does not mean they believe a singular explanation for why things exist.

  • 21 months ago
  • 3 points

This is not realistic.

What is "realistic?" Realism is based on our understanding of the physical laws that govern our universe (the four fundamental forces). In the absence of a universe (pre-big bang) there is no realism. There are no laws to govern the norm. No trends that we can see. Because there is no anything. While it's massively mind boggling to try and think in terms like this, this is something we have to accept based off of pretty much every bit of evidence that we have (all the galaxies on the larges scales are moving away from us, and they are doing so faster the further out we look). If you were to roll back time, eventually all of these galaxies that were heading away from us would collide into a single point (the singularity). We can and do observe this.

This may be a "theory" but it's not a regular theory. It's a scientific theory. Which, contrary to popular misconception is a testable prediction based on observations which has yet to be proven false even once. If it is proven false or slightly incorrect on the predictions that should be able to be made from the theory then the theory has to be changed or scrapped. This is why it is safe to assume most of our scientific theories are correct. If they are proven incorrect, the change. After decades of people trying and failing to prove them incorrect it's not crazy to assume them correct.

The idea that something can simply begin to exist without rhyme or reason is madness, and it is not scientific to believe anything about the very beginning of existence, seeing as it cannot be observed nor tested.

It cannot be directly observed or detected. But, it's outcome can. We can see the earlier point in the universe when it stopped being opaque (CMB - Cosmic Microwave Background) and we can see the slight deviations in the thermal composition of the early universe (hot spots went on to form super massive clusters while the cooler spots went on to become relatively empty voids in space). We can also observe, as I stated previously, that all current galaxies are heading away from us (net not gross) and each other. This is something we can and do observe and it's means we can make a prediction on it's implications (the universe is a) expanding and b) started at a singular point).

'who created God?' Answer: he doesn't need a beginning

I have to point out the logical fallacy in your statements. You state that something existing without "rhyme or reason" is madness. Then, why does God exist? Why isn't your claim applicable to both queries? Your ideas of what is or isn't madness is based on worldly knowledge. Knowledge you gained from expereiencing the universe. It's not as easy to take that worldly knowledge and attempt to apply it to otherworldly (pre-big bang, God, etc) concepts. There is bound to be confusion.

God literally invented those things, beginnings wouldn't exist if he had not created them.

But how did he create those things? Did they just poof into existence? Did he build them from atoms? Or, did he put in place the precursor "dominos" which would have led to their creation? And, before you bring up "seven days" I would like you to try and think of time dilatation. Time dilation is the difference in experienced time based on proximity to mass and relative speed. Due to this, seven days to God could be ~14 billion years to us. So, even the scripture when interpreted in certain ways can fit with science. God did not have to create everything instantly or manually. He could have just set the stage for it to happen.

Atheism: there was nothing and then there was, we do not understand this however, and it really makes no sense, if there is nothing then there is also no possibility, thus it cannot be possible for this to happen

This is definitely not the definition of Atheism. For one thing, I believe in the Big Bang, and am not atheist. So....

Theism: God created beginnings, thus explaining both the origin of the universe and God. This is a logical framework.

Not the definition of Theism either. Theism simply means you believe a god or multiple gods. It has nothing directly pertaining to creationist theories.

as Holmes put it (not word for word probably, just of memory) 'once we eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how absurd, must be true', if there is nothing (not even possibility) then nothing can create itself.

Holmes was a fictional cocaine addicted character in a series of books written 100 years ago. I don't think we should base our logical reasoning on him.

also reading the bible never hurt anyone, save their feelings

Tell that to the persecuted Christians in the Roman empire.

  • 21 months ago
  • 5 points

This is definitely not the definition of Atheism. For one thing, I believe in the Big Bang, and am not atheist.

Not to mention one of the originators of the big bang theory was an ordained Catholic priest.

  • 21 months ago
  • 4 points

Stop! You're poking holes in fallacious argument points!

[comment deleted]
  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm not twisting them. I'm both interpreting them and taking the logic behind them to their extremes to show the fallacy there. I'm trying to show how looking at something through narrow blinds will lead to misconstrued interpretations and conclusions.

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

A big thing also besides what others have said is that you can't control many aspects of life. You should accept this and move on. Otherwise you will live you life in constant fear and thats not healthy now is it.

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

Find what gives you peace in this life and hold onto it. Life is too short to live in anxiety based on possible bad outcomes. Live a good and happy life and you will not regret it.

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

Wow - I'm impressed by the answers and comments. Everyone gets a point for respect and decency, regardless of being in agreement or not with the content.

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