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The Best Anti-virus is Common Sense.

Crazycatman

16 months ago

No Anti-virus is the best. Been 4 years, without Windows defender and all that junk. System is faster, and if you know what your doing you won't have problems in the first place.

Comments

  • 16 months ago
  • 8 points

No Anti-virus is the best. Been 4 years, without Windows defender and all that junk. System is faster, and if you know what your doing you won't have problems in the first place while minimally affecting your everyday tasks.

No, the best Antivirus is the one that will prevent you from getting a virus even when common sense / deception screw you.

It doesn't make you sound superior at all when you're like "Look at me, no viruses for 4 years because I know what not to do." Because eventually you'll likely be that person saying "Look at me, no viruses for 4 years until I ****** up and now I'm infected with WannaCry and all my files are encrypted."

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd generally tend to agree... ...to an extent. The best protection for your PC is you. Take commonsense measures and practice good habits. It will prevent bad things from happening MOST of the time. Even with the best security measures in place, it still comes down to you and the choices you make.

However, programmers are very clever. And unless you're REALLY keeping up on what they're doing and how, they will eventually come up with a way of compromising your machine that you wouldn't expect and won't be prepared for. If you're smart, social engineering tactics may never get the better of you, but that doesn't mean exploits that can totally bypass your awareness can't still get in! To assume that every compromise began with someone being tricked outright is assuming too much. Not every way of getting in requires abject trickery. And it is impossible for any one operator to stay completely up on every new exploit that comes out. It's a very fast-moving target. Unless you want to make studying PC security a very serious hobby, you can never hope to even begin to catch up.

Are you going to wake up every morning and pour over the latest zero-day exploits? That's what you'd have to do. What's "safe" to do today may not be safe tomorrow. And there's a damned good chance that much of what is considered okay now never was safe! The truth of security is there is no absolute safe way to operate. There are ways to minimize your chances of being compromised, but by nature of the systems we use, security openings are a necessity. It's a matter of probability. There is no guaranteed safe practice - only least risky. It is always a give and take. And to not acknowledge that puts you at risk.

And then there's the fact that it doesn't matter how smart and disciplined you are, you ARE a human being. And human beings are fallible. We don't always exercise the best judgment. And the catch-22 to succeeding in making good choices for a long time, and knowing it, is that we tend to get complacent and overly-trusting of our choices and observations. Nobody on this planet is in touch enough to constantly be on the ball. Things happen, man. Hubris is a real *****. The whole point behind making bad decisions is that you tend to think they are good ones at the time! Give it some time, everyone slips eventually... ...malware writers know this well.

To me, it's kind of silly NOT to run some form of protection. Kind of a needlessly cavalier attitude to have. There was a time when most protection software was heavily bloated and/or resource-intensive. And oftentimes the only methods for truly being safe were very intrusive to general use. That's not really true anymore, and hasn't been for a long time. Nowadays, you wouldn't even know your protection was actually doing anything until it caught something. Even low-end machines can now run smoothly with protection software enabled.

I mean really now. If you're seeing any appreciable performance loss from running a little background protection, it might be time to for a serious hardware upgrade...

And at the end of the day, it's just SO much easier to setup and run a pair of anti-virus/anti-malware apps BEFORE you get caught off guard than it is to be stuck cleaning up the mess after you've been seriously compromised. It only takes one screw-up to irreparably damage your system, you know? Why take the risk when the compromise to performance and ease of use is basically not a compromise at all? To me, that's not a very common-sense attitude...

  • 15 months ago
  • 0 points

My PC performance is out of the question and will last a decade before it's reached it's time. I hate false positives. All my cracking and exploit software for some games and programs gets deleted Everytime in the past.. also McAfee and Norton.. have really screwed me over in the past. I don't like problems, and if getting all the hardware gone at once instead of suffering is better. Replace it and be done. Not the best idea, but the literal chance it will happen is very slim.

From my point I wouldn't really worry that much. I know some people are very cautious. I'm not included. If I'm doing something I know, it's not easy to screw u with out purposely doing it. If anything I would leave defender on, guess I'm just paranoid. But I have always had problems with Anti-virus programs.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Hah, I guess I can relate to that. Fair enough. I can think of one specific event recently where WD really didn't like me modding Skyrim SE. My install is legal. Just something about the way one of my utilities edits things in memory sets most AVs off.

McAfee and Norton... I will not touch. Too many terrible memories. Anybody remember what it was like to try and uninstall those back in the day? Additionally, the way they like to "bundle" themselves with all sorts of unrelated software is gross to me. Makes me not want to use them. Not to mention they don't even seem to work that well. Even Mr. McAfee himself doesn't recommend using it <_<

Don't get me wrong... ...they're actually good now, but for me, it's like that one ex who did you so wrong - she hurt you real bad and it took months to repair the damage. But now she wants you back. She seems different. Maybe she really has changed, but you'll never see her the same way, no matter how good she may be to you. That is McAfee and Norton to me.

I've been really impressed with Windows Defender and Emsisoft Anti-Malware. I hardly know they're there, but between the two I have pretty substantial AV and AM protection. When I need to, I easily disable active protection and all is well. Oftentimes I leave it off and let my nightly scans handle things. Haven't had a single conflict yet, and what malware has gotten picked up this way has been minor.

I set up WD to do weekly comprehensive scans and nightly quick scans with task scheduler and a little while later, Emsisoft runs its own nightly scan and auto-quarantines. I have it check for rootkits weekly. It's all so easy and hands-off. It just works. No input from me and no interference.

And really, the performance impact is completely negligible. I'm sure it could be measured, but I honestly can't say that I notice a difference at all. The footprint for some of the better stuff out there has gone wayy down. This is especially true with the free versions, which tend not to have any active protection. I think most people can do without that as long as they have good habits and perform regular scans. Not everyone needs their hand held.

To me, that's a good trade off. Puts you a little more at risk, but you never have to worry about behavior checkers messing with stuff you're installing or running. If they ever want to, you'll see it in the scan results before they have a chance to mess anything up - and from there its generally pretty easy to make sure they leave it alone for good. Just gotta pay attention when you're installing new things. I tend to just run scans immediately after to see if any false flags get picked up and deal with it then and there. Takes maybe a few minutes.

I mean, to each his own. I get it. Trust me, for years I was with you. I HATED security apps. In my case, I ran a not-so-fast machine and needed every mb of ram and every CPU cycle I could free up. I've always been big on optimizing my systems to absolute best running conditions. And at the time, AV's tended to hog too many resources and often broke things/caused instability. That's a big reason why I was a linux user for years and years. That way, I didn't have much to worry about unless I was being really dumb. And as a failsafe I would just keep my data backed up on an external drive that otherwise stayed disconnected - so if I ever had major infections that could no longer be fixed, I'd start from scratch.

But for my new build I decided to switch to windows 10. And I gotta say, as far as security goes, we've come a long way from the Win7 days. Windows 10 itself runs great. Windows Defender may be my favorite security software ever. And Emsisoft my be the only anti malware software I've ever used that didn't bug the crap out of me.

The whole game has changed. There are a lot of new protection suites out there that are very efficient and sophisticated. Competition has really driven these companies wayyy forward.

I just think the compromises are so good these days that they're hardly compromises. Its at least worth looking into. I mean, if you can get something on your system that doesn't affect performance whatsoever but makes it much better protected, why not?

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Well not to over exaggerat too much, I do leave Windows Defender on, as I guess it still runs even tho I turned it off. Task manager says otherwise.

Other than that everything has been fine for me. I just hate the way false positives get handled that's about it. And Bundle-ware is cancer too. Those cancel and check boxes will really get you. Main problem I had years ago.

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