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Applying thermal paste on a CPU with a bare die?

LeOrange
  • 38 months ago

Hello, I am building a retro computer centering around the use of an AGP port. The CPU I'm using is the AMD Sempron 3300+. At least that's what I think the name is. I bought it here: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B002TT0KUU/

Anyways, I was concerned about applying thermal paste. Applying thermal paste on modern Intel and AMD CPUs is no problem, as they have IHSs. But This one has no IHS; it just has a bare die. I was wondering if I have to worry about the amount of thermal paste I use, that is, should I only put enough to make sure I cover the die only? Or do I not have to worry about it, and I can put more thermal paste to make sure I cover the whole die, even if some paste spills over to the rest of the top of the CPU (but of course not too much over; definitely not into the socket or motherboard).

I have Arctic Silver 5 as well as Arctic MX-4. From what I understand, some pastes are electrically conductive. I have no clue however which ones are and aren't.

I think the answer to this is similar to the answer regarding applying thermal paste to modern delidded CPUs. Please correct me if I am wrong in this regard. Thank you so much.

Comments

  • 38 months ago
  • 4 points

...Arctic MX-4...

That one is not conductive.
Those that are not conductive, typically advertise that fact since it would be considered a benefit. e.g. Their website, packaging...

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Great, I'll use that one then. Thanks for your help.

  • 38 months ago
  • 2 points

It is unavoidable that some will spread over the edge of the CPU onto the PCB. This doesn't mean you want to glob it on though. You should always be conservative with your application. AS5 is technically capacitive, which means it can store a charge. MX4 is safer, and performs very similarly. That being said, I used AS5 on my laptop CPU and GPU (neither of which has a heat shield) and it's perfectly fine.

How do you plan to cool this chip without a heat shield?

  • 38 months ago
  • 2 points

I'll just apply the MX-4 and the Socket A HSF. I imagine that's how it was done back in the day.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Don't you mean a heat sink? Because a heat shield is meant to protect the device from heat. For example, if you had an m.2 ssd mounted under your gpu, the ssd would get blasted by the hot air coming from the gpu, therefore heating up the ssd. In this case you would want a heat shield to deflect that hot air away from the ssd. On the other hand a heat sink is meant to move heat away from a device. For example you would put a heat sink on your cpu, to pull heat away from the cpu and exhaust it else where, there by keeping the cpu cool. If you where to put a heat shield on your cpu, it would instantly start to thermal throttle because there is nothing to pull the heat away from the cpu.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

No I don't mean heat sink, but I did screw up. I should have said heat spreader, and misspoke when I said heat shield. The CPU OP is referring to is shown without an integrated heat spreader (IHS).

AFAIK, you can't just mount a desktop heat sink onto a desktop CPU that doesn't have an IHS. Even when delidding CPUs, they (every time I have seen it anyways) reattach the IHS afterwards.

  • 38 months ago
  • 2 points

when delidding a cpu you do not need the IHS anymore... many people delid only to better connect the IHS to the die, but you can place a heatsink directly to it also, which is overall more common and more effective... you need to be careful of the heatsink material and the thermal compound used though as a bad combo can create corrosion or other damage aside from the usual conductivity issues.

  • 38 months ago
  • 2 points

Good to know, thanks. I had no idea!

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

no problem. gotta spread the knowledge :)

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Ok, that makes sense, because modern cpu coolers are meant for cpus with a ihs so attempting to mount a modern cpu cooler to a delidded chip would result in the cooler not making contact with the cpu. Or something like that.

The other problem with delidded cpus is that it is super easy to crack the cpu die if the cooler is improperly mounted, as in, if you put too much pressure on one side or corner of the cpu.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

MAKE SURE you install the cooler correctly or you can crack the cpu die.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, I already practiced without thermal paste. Thank you.

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