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Comments (Continued)

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Oh thx so much. What a legend. But r u sure that a 480 ssd is enough memory

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

For me totally not, I got way too much stuff, but on a budget build I would still take a 480GB SSD over a 1TB HDD because you can still hold a number of games on it, just not an entire steam library if you have a ton of games. The beauty of building a PC yourself is the upgradability if you do run out of space. Say in a year you find the SSD too small and need more storage you can get a 3-4TB HDD and add it into your build. Then keep your most played games on the SSD and less played games on the HDD. Just keep in mind windows boot time is like ~15 seconds on a SSD and 2-3 minutes on a HDD. Game loading bars can be painful on HDDs too.

If you have a ton of games that won't all fit on the SSD and can't afford to spend more on storage a simple solution is to only install the games you are currently playing and uninstall when done. Though I am not sure if you store a bunch of other stuff. I got multiple TB in videos stored on my PC which is why I got so many drives in my rig.

Though $500 is a very tight budget so you really have to consider every dollar spent to get as much out of it as possible. The CPU and GPU together is the bulk of what makes your gaming experience which is why just those 2 parts are half the overall PC cost. If you had a larger budget then an even larger % will go to just those 2 parts. I would not think it worth it to get an R3 1200 or 2200g just to get a larger storage drive because it would hurt game performance more and upgrading a CPU is much less efficient than adding a HDD later on. You can still keep the original SSD if you buy a new HDD, you can't use the old CPU in the build if you buy a new one so wasted money.

Another way to differ costs is in the operating System. You can get the "Media Creation Tool" from microsoft's website to make a bootable USB to install windows with. From there you can run the trial version until you can purchase a licence key. Both times during the installation that it asks to enter a licence key they do give you a skip option and that allows you to use the trial. Though you can't set a wallpaper and you get an "activate windows" watermark in the bottom right corner of the screen among other things on the trial version but at least you can still play your games. It is really nice that Microsoft allows you to do this.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Also with the gpu, does the brand matter.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Well different brands give different warranties and can have different coolers. The actual GPUs chips are about the same in all of them. Some people prefer brands that gives better warranties and have better support and some prefer to spend more on a better built on cooler. That being said the cheaper brands should also work just fine and for performance there is not a large gap in power from the worst to best of the same video card type. Again because they have the same GPU chips across them.

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