Description

My first build, "Orange Box," was based on free second-hand parts in an orange case, so when it came time to build my second machine, I decided to keep some of those characteristics. When I saw the orange Corsair case, I knew that it was for me. I have been reading/watching about the new RTX cards, as well as some of the newer Ryzen chips, and I was planning on trying AMD out for a change. Talking about it around work for a few weeks had a coworker bring up that he had an old Dell business computer floating around that I could have, and he said that he'd bring it to work sometime. Meanwhile, I found a screaming deal on the EVGA G2 750w power supply, ~$50 after a mail in rebate, so I picked up two of them. Shortly after that my coworker brought the Dell to work: it was a SFF Optiplex 7010 with an I7 3770, a 250gb Seagate HDD, and a legit copy of Windows 7. My first build, that I have been gaming on up to this point, was built in 2016, and featured an LGA775 Q6600, so this would be a remarkable step up. I briefly considered building in the Dell SFF case, as I liked its size, but decided against it. I needed more room. Then I considered using the Dell motherboard, but could find little info about it, other than they seem to need to keep all of their accessories attached to avoid errors/warnings. So, I did the right thing and picked up an ASUS mb second hand off of Ebay for $100, which was more than I wanted to pay, but I am happy with the result. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 made me happy in my last build, so I used it again...the Dell cooler was a weird laid-over and stretched monster that I wasn't going to reuse. The RAM I found new on Ebay for $80, SSD was from Newegg. The Gigabyte wireless wifi/bluetooth card was another piece that I used in my previous build, and I haven't had any issues with it. I simply allowed Windows 10 to come up with drivers for it and leave it alone. I used the Windows 7 activation code from the case to get a copy of Windows 10. The RTX 2060 was simply a silly impulse that I decided to embrace. My previous build, with the Q6600, had a brand new ASUS ROG STRIX GTX 960 in it, so a build with a silly GPU seemed to play in theme. I'm still learning about building these systems, and the fact that what I've made so far works is partly luck and partly the help of this site. I built some computers in high school, when the internet was new, but that isn't much reference for what we have today. I do some research, and pay attention to trends...I generally trust brands that pop up more often, or that I see others using. I lucked out with the RAM that I purchased here, I failed to remember to see if it was even compatible with the board--but it is. I still don't have a great grasp on what the RAM speeds and timings mean, but I'll get it. So far I haven't really pressed this machine hard, and I don't know that I ever will. The games that I play aren't incredibly demanding, but I have found that I can turn all of the graphics settings up as high as they go and still play with a reasonable frame rate. I'm still playing through HDMI to a 1080p television set, so I haven't gotten to enjoy the higher resolutions that this card can deliver...I'm considering a monitor, but I've never bought one before, and there is a lot of variety. I think that I'd like to try some VR at some point, too. At this point this machine is only a week old, and I'm sure that it will be running for some time to come. Looking forward to the future... PS: I haven't found a way to edit the parts prices yet, but quick math says that I spent about $850 on this build. The CPU temp under load was the highest that I saw while running a benchmark.

Part Reviews

CPU

This is a big step up after a 2.4 Core 2 Quad Q6600. Nice to have a more capable machine. This one has been locked up in a business computer for who-knows-how-long, still remains the Heart of the Tiger

CPU Cooler

These are great, tried and true. This will be the second one that I've bought, seems to deliver

Motherboard

My first ASUS board. Big, with plenty of slots and room to work. It can probably do things that I'm not even aware of

Storage

Had never heard of this brand, picked solely by price. I have nearly 200gb on it so far and it seems to run strong

Storage

A free, second hand hard drive that I have yet to use. A benchmark that I ran that tests the HDD was impressed with this one...but maybe that was because it's empty

Video Card

Probably more capable than I will ever utilize it, but I like knowing that it has more to give.

Case

Simple, with good airflow. Came with three fans, 2 of which are orange led. Looks cool. There are mounts for up to 3 more fans...so I filled them with 3 140mm Spectre fans that are also orange led. Still subtle

Power Supply

My first new PSU, and my first fully modular PSU. Love it

Wireless Network Adapter

Used one of these in my previous build, so I stuck with it. Works great, no problems, and I'll would buy it again

Comments

  • 10 months ago
  • 4 points

nice build, I hope you upgrade somethings in the future, weird question but does the graphics card have rgb?

  • 10 months ago
  • 3 points

I’m pretty sure it’s either green EVGA RTX 2060 or that in blue

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

This EVGA card is prety bare-bones. There is no lighting whatsoever, and a backing plate that only covers 1/3 of the card. It also doesn't seem to have come with the free game that other cards are listed with, but I'm ok with that as I have no interest in either Battlefield 5 or Anthem. The only lights in the case are the orange fans, and a single green light on the motherboard.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Alright thanks for the info

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Hi. Pretty build. Would you mind tell me about the performance of the RTX 2060 with the i7 3770? I'm asking because is a 7 years old CPU with a 2019 GPU. Thanks a lot and congrats.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I haven't pushed it very hard. The games that I do play will run 60fps at 1080p with the settings all turned up. I ran the benchmark for Rise of the Tomb Raider and held 59-60 fps with Direct X 12 on and all settings high/very high. Cities:Skylines holds 60fps with max settings, and 7 Days to Die sits at around 50-60fps, depending on the settings. I have yet to try any of my other games, but I imagine that they'll yield similar results

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

nice build.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Shame that a $500 gpu has no backplate

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

$379, but, yes, it is a bit disappointing. It does some great work, though

[comment deleted]
  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Edit: this was meant as a reply to malcar11. To the original poster, good job on the build! My first desktop build experience was also on an old Dell business machine. E8500 CPU. Strong performance for an old dual core.

Probably runs like a champ. I have a i7-4770 and upgraded to the FE RTX 2060 a couple days ago. On Fallout 4 it can handle max settings, minus weapons detail for some reason. Makes the game crash, but that may be a driver issue. Skyrim special edition is maxed out and delivers steady 60 FPS at 1080p. Borderlands 2 is maxed out, 60 FPS at 1080. Same with Wicher 3, though I don’t remember if I toned down hair effects. Tomb Raider (2013) I ran the included benchmark and maxed all settings, including hair, it it was 59-60 FPS. Despite all the power I’m still just as likely to play Dota on Warcraft 3/ Frozen Thrones, C&C Generals, or FF9 than latest bleeding edge AAA titles.

There’s a lot of life left in these older i7s.

For reference, it’s a self built PC from partially donated parts. I7-4770. 16 gb RAM. OS runs from 500 gb Samsung 850 ssd. Psu is Corsair 750. Old GPU was a single slot gtx 750 ti. That also ran admirable on the above mentioned games.

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Well, this sounds exactly like my build, and it sounds like the sort of games that I play. These CPUs must be pretty similar, eh?

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

I just checked on userbenchmark and it sounds like the CPU’s are about 5% apart. Pretty close.